Hummus en Fuego

Hummus en Fuego Recipe

I keep homemade crushed red pepper oil on hand to use as a simple condiment and flavor accent. I call it fire oil, and it couldn't be easier to make. Sprinkle crushed red pepper flakes in hot olive oil, let it cool, and ignore it. The flavor lights up over the next day or two, and the longer I leave it, the better. I also make hummus regularly to eat as an afternoon snack, but until now it hadn't occurred to me to combine these two favorites. So here you have it, a hummus of sorts made from pureed garbanzo beans, toasted walnuts, and spicy crushed red pepper oil. The rustic red pepper flecks and translucent olive oil are set against the creamy backdrop of the pureed beans. To finish things off, I couldn't resist a few oily, black olives and chopped cilantro - both of which I had on hand.

If you are wary of spicy foods, add the oil incrementally, or dilute it to your tastes with more olive oil before using. This is one of those recipes where you really need to do adjust to your own individual tastes. My only regret was not baking up a batch of these olive-oil crackers.

Hummus en Fuego Recipe

A couple tips before you get started - rub the skins of the walnuts off a bit after you toast them, it's nothing I really pay too much attention to for a recipe like this, but the skins can be a bit bitter and tannic. And again, make the crushed red pepper oil a day or two ahead if possible.

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes

3/4 cup walnuts, toasted
2 cups cooked (or canned) garbanzo beans, drained
1 medium clove garlic
juice of 1/2 a lemon (about 2 tablespoons)
1/2 cup hot water

1/4 cup oil-cured olives, chopped
a bit of chopped cilantro

Make the hot pepper oil a day or so ahead of time by heating the olive oil in a small saucepan for a couple minutes - until it is about as hot as you would need it to saute some onions, but not so hot that it smokes or smells acrid or burned. Turn off the heat and stir in the crushed red pepper flakes. Set aside and let cool, ideally for a day or two - to let the flavor really develop.

To make the hummus, give the walnuts a spin in the food processor, just until they are a sandy texture. Add most of the garbanzos, 1 or 2 tablespoons of the red chile oil (oil only, no flakes), garlic, and lemon juice. Now process until smooth. Drizzle in the water a bit at a time and puree more, until the hummus is creamy and billowy. I tend to let the food processor run for a minute or so at this point, it incorporates air into the puree and makes it a nice texture. Taste, adjust the seasoning - more salt, more lemon juice, etc.

Serve in a shallow bowl, drizzled with plenty of the remaining oil and red pepper flakes. I like to add any remaining garbanzo beans at this point as well as some olives and a bit of chopped cilantro for the final touch.

Makes roughly 2 1/2 cups..

If you make this recipe, I'd love to see it - tag it #101cookbooks on Instagram!

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Comments

  • What a perfectly wonderful idea! And boy did you capture a good picture of it :)

    RecipeGirl
  • How peculiar, just two says ago I was wondering why I had never seen a recipe using flavored olive oil in hummus. This one sounds lovely!

    Beth
  • I cannot wait to try this recipe! It looks beyond delicious!

    La Traductora
  • I cannot wait to try this recipe! It looks beyond delicious!

    La Traductora
  • no tahini? i'm surprised!

    Tai
  • The photo makes me drool! Your site always inspire me to take the time and prepare my food- once again, you've done it! Store bought just seems weak in comparison. Keep up the tasty work!

    Kayla
  • Score! This is officially the first recipe in which I have everything necessary just a-waitin' in the kitchen and/or pantry (though it's hardly the first I've drooled over).

    Lucy
  • Wow! Your hummus looks amazing. I have the recipe printed and ready to try this evening. Our recipe for Traditional Lebanese Hummus suggests to add Jalapenos for a spicy kick, but I equally love your idea of using homemade crushed red pepper oil, especially since it's so easy to make. Another simple way to add a little heat to your meal: marinate prawns, or better yet, seasonal veggies, in crushed red pepper oil prior to grilling - Outstanding!

    Ellie from Kitchen Caravan
  • This is so fantastic Heidi! I love that you used walnuts instead of tahini and I love even more that there are olives on top. Again, a great creative twist on the original.

    Sarah@stomachlove
  • I practically LIVE for spicy foods, so this recipe is PERFECT :-)

    VeggieGirl
  • I love hummus, but have not been eating it as much lately, due to the nutritionals. I suppose that is due to the tahini paste, so I would definately try it without!

    Deanna
  • Must make that fire oil now! Crushed red pepper is in almost everything I make (wish my hubby liked it though!) Thanks Heidi!

    Biz
  • Thank you so much! Amazing pictures! This is one of my favorites - just incredible. Your presentation is marvelous, doll! ;)

    Cindy
  • Have to try this, I always make hummus, never thought to use walnuts. I have used sprouted almonds instead of beans.

    chana
  • wow. i've never been able to get my olive oil noticeably spicy in 20 minutes. it usually takes a few weeks. maybe i have slow peppers...!!!!!

    kristina
  • Wow! This sounds so good. Do you always make your hummus with nuts as opposed to tahini? Or do you use tahini sometimes also? Do you prefer one way over the other? I have tahini that I just bought in the fridge, but I like the idea of using walnuts instead.

    Kristin
  • What is obvious about your recipes and photos is the excellence and pride with which you share them. I love the nutrition focus, which is so helpful for those of us on the go, like myself, clueless sometimes about what to make for dinner. Just a healthy idea for me, means so much. Your presentation and food combinations are much appreciated. I knew I needed more walnuts.... Can't wait to try this recipe. Thank you for making my world a better place.

    leangreencafe
  • That looks fantastic. I just started getting into the chick pea thing. I actually just posted a recipe for honey roasted chick peas that turned out great. My sister loves all things spicy, I might have to make your oil with red pepper flakes for her for Christmas! Great idea! www.slim-shoppin.com

    Jennifer von Ebers
  • That sounds gorgeous! I do so love hummus. And you have reminded me - which I had forgotten until this minute - that my grandmother used to make chilli sherry: she would soak whole dried chillies in cheap sherry for about three weeks, and use the result to flavour soups, stews, etc. You can top up the sherry as necessary!

    Mrs Redboots
  • Now you've got me thinking about those crackers, and wanting to make something like this to pair them with...I'm not much for cooking, but I may have to try this one out. ;)

    Maya
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