Hummus with Green Goo

Hummus with Green Goo Recipe

Twin Peaks are two of the most impressive hills in a city filled with impressive hills. They top out just shy of 1000 feet, and from the primary outlook you see two signature red-orange towers to the north, the tightly clustered high-rise buildings downtown, streaks of candy-colored Victorians, and a maze of streets that criss and cross the city. The whole scene is framed by the formidable bay, and if you turn your head along its path from the west you see it squeeze between Marin and San Francisco, around the tip of the peninsula, then south, south, south toward the airport and beyond. On a clear day, that is.

Green Hummus Recipe

Twin Peaks is the sort of place you might forget to visit if you live in San Francisco. The parking lot has a stretch of slots allocated to tour buses, and a collection of coin-operated telescopes. You share the view with globe-trotting visitors, and if you listen in, chances are, you'll hear an impressive range of tongues.

Green Hummus Recipe

Every other week, Wayne and I find ourselves tourists in our own city. Our housekeeper comes early in the morning and we find ourselves cast into the city before most establishments are open. Sometimes we set out on foot, usually with cameras, other times we hop in the car. This time out we found ourselves on top of Twin Peaks.

Green Hummus Recipe

If I'd planned ahead, I would have packed a bundle of snacks to enjoy along with the vistas, instead we had to wait until we returned home. I whipped up a batch of hummus from a pound of chickpeas I'd cooked the day before. They quickly became a memorable version of hummus topped with a vibrant, lively green chile drizzle.

Green Hummus Recipe

This hummus was based on a version I spotted in the Insalata's cookbook, a self-published book my friend Hannah passed along to me recently. It's not like I need another hummus recipe, but there were a couple things that struck me as interesting about the version in this book (her green harissa also caught my attention). Heidi Krahling does the thing where she cooks the chickpeas with baking soda, something I normally don't do, but tried this time. Then, when pureeing the chickpeas, she lets the food processor go for a full three minutes. The resulting hummus is light, almost billowy, and remains so even after a couple days in the refrigerator. The "green goo" as she calls it is made from olive oil, garlic, jalapeño, and parsley. She does a chopped version, but I ended up making a spicy green emulsion using the food processor (it was already out on the counter).

It's worth noting the green drizzle is great on lots of things, not just hummus. I've been enjoying it over eggs, roasted vegetables, drizzled in crepes, and it goes particularly well with quinoa.

I hope you enjoy the hummus, and I hope you have the opportunity to enjoy being a tourist in your own city (or town, or village) now and then.

Hummus with Green Goo

This hummus keeps nicely, refrigerated, for a few days, but is best served at room temperature. As Heidi notes in her recipe, the hummus might thicken in the refrigerator. If this happens, you can simply thin it with a splash of water. Adjust with salt and lemon juice if needed as well. If you are sensitive to heat, you can deseed and devein the jalepeno.

Hummus:
1 pound / 453 g dried chickpeas, soaked in water for at least 4 hours, drained

1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup water
scant 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoons fine grain sea salt
1/3 cup / 80ml tahini

Green Goo
1/4 cup Italian parsley
1 jalapeño, destemmed
1 large clove garlic
scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2/3 cup / 160 ml extra virgin olive oil

In a large pot cover the chickpeas with 2 inches of water. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the baking soda, and reduce the heat. Simmer, skimming any foam from the surface, until the chickpeas are soft but still structured, roughly an hour. Drain.

Place 4 cups / 1.5 pounds / 650 g of the cooked chickpeas in a food processor. You can set aside any remaining chickpeas and have them as a snack or use them in a stew or soup. To the food processor add the water, lemon juice, and salt. Process for three minutes or until completely smooth. Scrape down the sides of the bowl once or twice along the way. If you like your hummus thinner add more water a small splash at a time. Add the tahini, process one more time. Taste and adjust the seasoning, add more salt or lemon juice if needed. Transfer the hummus to a serving bowl.

To make the "green goo" rinse out the food processor bowl, and use it again, and if you don't have a food processor, you can certainly do a hand-chopped version. Pulse the parsley, jalapeño, garlic, and salt in the food processor. Slowly drizzle the olive oil into the mixture while the processor is running, until an green emulsion is created. Transfer to a jar, taste, and adjust the seasoning.

Drizzle the hummus generously with the green goo. I realize now, I didn't use nearly enough in the photo up above.

Serve with pita chips, crackers, flatbread, or toasted lavash.

Makes 4 cups of hummus.

Adapted from Insalata's Mediterranean Table written by Heidi Insalata Krahling of Insalata's Restaurant in San Anselmo, California.

Prep time: 240 minutes - Cook time: 60 minutes

If you make this recipe, I'd love to see it - tag it #101cookbooks on Instagram!

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Comments

I too have used baking soda and it really speeds up the cooking process. But I have read that it depletes the body's uptake of minerals so stopped using it. I would love that not to be the case, let me know if you know better.

emma

Thanks for the tip to visit Twin Peaks. We will be visiting your fair city for a long weekend this summer and we will check it out. Love the hummus!

Diane

I love hummus; this sounds delish, Heidi...it's such a perfect dish for sandwiches, pitas, chips and toppings for burgers, patties and a delicious dip for sweet potato fries! Enjoy your weekend.

I grew up in Danville, CA, and you can see Mt. Diablo, Danville's mountain, from Twin Peaks. I never fully understood the beauty and draw of SF until I traveled all over Europe, Israel, and Japan. Then I went back home and saw SF with new eyes. It remains one of my favorite cities in the world. I love seeing your posts and reminders of that beauty. Thank you. And what better way to share SF than with a hummus recipe? Hummus is also one of my favorite foods. Heidi, thank you again for bringing me back there, for reminding me of the little joys, the beauty in everything, and integrating it with yummy food.

How convenient we are having friends over tonight for a hummus 'party'! We make ours with equal parts chickpeas and edamame so it is already slightly green- this 'goo' on top will be GORGEOUS! I am also curious about the cilantro-for-parsley applications! Drizzled on top of Huevos Rancheros perhaps? Yet another reason to make hummus every week... :-)

Gretchen

I will be the voice of dissent re baking soda. If your beans are less than two years old, there's just no need for it and it adds a weird flavor. And beans, which are famous for being a back-burner leisure food now have to be closely watched because the beans can "turn" on a dime and turn to mush without your noticing. It's out of my skill set but apparently it adversely affects the nutrition as well, but I'd have to do research as to why. Fresh beans will aid digestion and cooking ease in a more pleasant manner! Save the soda for your quickbreads and muffins, say I!

What a happy, cleaning-day routine you two have. I'm wondering what else we could do with the "green goo". Fish tacos perhaps?

Oh yes, I can never have too many versions of hummus. What an interesting idea to cook with chickpeas with baking soda...

Heidi, this is a wonderful idea. The green goo sounds similar in taste to 'green chutney' we maharashtrians often make as a spread for sandwiches. Oh by the way, I am desparately waiting for your first asparagus recipe of this season. XOXO, Gayatri

Gayatri

considering how much hummus we demolish in my house, one can never have too many recipes. especially when they involve green goo, which sounds delightful.

"Green goo" I like that. Whatever it's called I'm sure it's delicious with all those amazing ingredients. I love hummus and alway stry to experiment with it by adding new flavors.

I've always found it a time saver to put the dried chick peas into a crock pot and cook slowly for about three hours. A tablespoon or two of extra virgin olive oil, while you are pureeing the chick peas, also helps to make them fluffy. I think I'll go make hummus now! Thanks for the inspiration!

Baking soda? Now this i have to try. I've heard of people peeling their chickpeas but that sounds like torture to me :-)

This sounds delightful! I also love that it has green goo...

I can't tell you how much I really, really adore those photos of you and Wayne. Like, really, a lot. There so good. Speaking of good, sign me up for green goo.

Baking soda is also added when one is cooking dried beans in places where the water is 'hard' or filled with minerals, which makes dried beans difficult to soften during cooking. A pinch of bicarbonate of soda neutralizes the water and minimizes the cooking time. Thanks for the reminder to be a tourist in our own cities. I keep forgetting to do it, too!

Hummus is one of our major food groups around here. We'll definitely have to try the green goo as I'm always looking for things to jazz it up. One recent addition which really was awesome -- muffuletta olive salad.

Yum! Love those photos - they look like a throwback to another decade - gorgeous.

I'm off to the supermarked to buy the ingredients immediately - looks wonderful and the perfect weekend snack!

Amber

I really want to make my own hummus and what a great inspiration to get started!

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