Tokyo Five Grain Recipe

A colorful grain blend inspired by a recent trip to Japan. It features equal parts brown rice, red rice, and millet, plus some quinoa and amaranth.

Tokyo Five Grain

Many of the natural food cafes I enjoyed while in Tokyo stocked a small number of products available for purchase - honeys, dried beans, t-shirts, and little books full of cafe recipes. Almost all of them sold small packets of mixed grains. Some of the packets were barely the size of my palm, filled with miniscule amaranth grains, brown rice, and millet. Others packets were bigger featuring a various blends of whole grain rices, quinoa, and different beans. I've never seen anything quite like it available here at home, and I was excited to come back and play around with some new grain combinations. This particular blend was inspired by one packet I brought home. There's nothing inherently Japanese about the end result, aside from the origin of inspiration. It features equal parts brown rice, red rice, and millet, plus some quinoa and amaranth.

Five Grain Recipe

I've been enjoying it on its own, with a drizzle of soy sauce, and a couple drops of toasted sesame oil, but I could imagine this particular blend being great stir-fried with eggs and greens. Or fashioned into some sort of take on arancini by forming the cooked grains into balls, then dredging in egg-wash and breadcrumbs before pan-frying or baking. It could be a great stuffing for oven-roasted tomatoes, I could go on and on. Just keep in mind that the quinoa lends a dominant grassy note - and start thinking about ideas with that in mind.

101 Cookbooks Membership

Premium Ad-Free membership includes:
-Ad-free content
-Print-friendly recipes
-Spice / Herb / Flower / Zest recipe collection PDF
-Weeknight Express recipe collection PDF
-Surprise bonuses throughout the year

spice herb flower zest
weeknight express

Tokyo Five Grain Recipe

I don't rinse the amaranth along with the other grains because the grains are SO tiny they run right through my relatively fine-gauge strainer. So I stir them in later. Short grain brown rice will give you a stickier rice blend in the end, use medium if you prefer more separation. The photo up above features short grain.

1 cup short or medium grain brown rice
1 cup red Bhutanese rice
1 cup millet
1/3 cup quinoa
1/4 cup amaranth
2 teaspoons salt

Rinse the rices, millet, and quinoa. Drain and put in a large thick-bottomed pot. Stir in the salt and amaranth. Cover with water up to your knuckle - about two inches above the grains. Bring to a boil, then turn down the flame as low as it will go. Cook uncovered (simmering) until all water is gone, about 45 minutes.

If you overshot the amount of water you added and your grains cook before the water absorbs entirely, strain off any extra water.

This makes a big pot of mixed grains. Plenty for multiple meals.


If you make this recipe, I'd love to see it - tag it #101cookbooks on Instagram!

Comments are closed.

Apologies, comments are closed.

Comments

I love to mix rice and grains, too. I believe in complex carbs! I usually do brown, jasmine, light quinoa & dark quinoa. Now, I am excited about adding red rice. I recommend mixing brown rice and grains with white rice to people who are trying to ween themselves off of white rice. Each time, they can use less white rice in the mixture. By the way, a Peruvian friend taught me about another kind of red rice. If you boil beets, you can cook the rice in the the water used. You get to keep the nutrition (sodium, sulphur, chlorine, iodine, copper and vitamin A, B1, B2, C and bioflavonoids) of the beets and add color to your meal. It's really pretty.

m4peace

I, too, have been enjoying a weekly pot of "Granny's grains" for months now. I just had this week's combo --red quinoa, black rice, millet, purple prairie barley and amaranth -- for lunch, mixed with a saute of garam masala caramelized onions ( copy catting your tofu scramble onions) together with some kale, chard and raisins. Delicious.

JackieJ

I cooked similar food a while ago: mixing millet+quinoa+farro or sometimes 3/4 different kind of rice with cereals with roasted vegetables, and when I had left over, I made polpette the day after :)

Eva

thanks, I just purchased some red Bhutanese rice, this will be on our dinner table.

ginny

I just stumbled on your site last week and absolute love it! Your recipes are inspiring with all the ingredients that I love to use. Your photographs are absolutely amazing ... so mesmerizing. You have a wonderful eye....a truly gifted artist. :) I'm so happy to have found this site and have shared it w/ friends already. I checked out your cookbook from the library and am thrilled to have a new vegetarian book to love and enjoy! Thank you, Heidi! HS: Thanks for the kind words Michelle, glad to hear you are enjoying the site/book.

Michelle

I just stumbled on your site last week and absolute love it! Your recipes are inspiring with the ingredients that I love. Your photographs are absolutely amazing ... so mesmerizing. You have a wonderful eye....a truly gifted artist. :) I'm so happy to have found this site and have shared it w/ friends already. I checked out your cookbook from the library and am thrilled to have a new vegetarian book to love and enjoy! Thank you, Heidi!

Michelle

Just tried a pack of mixed grains from Trader Joe's (harvest grains blend) and it was great . . . red quinoa,red and green orzo, Israeli couscous and baby garbanzo beans. Ready to eat in less than fifteen minutes and you can add veggies, soy, etc. for variety.

Anne R

This looks great! I love your recipes, Heidi. When I cook them, use a lot less salt than they call for. I only add the salt at the very end, if needed.

Oscar M.S.

Hmm, do you think they were selling the really small packages for sprouting? Or were they single servings of grains? ;-) Thanks for this recipe! I'm always afraid to cook different grains together, and armed with a recipe I now can't wait to try this combo. You know, I think they could have been either of those things Lucy. It was hard to tell.

Lucy T.

I usually have a prepared grain mix in my fridge. I cook up a variety of grains separately and combine them after cooking. My favorites are farro, black and red quinoa, black barley and rice (brown, red, black-whatever I have). I combine the mix with salads, omlets or make salads a la tabbouleh. It's an easy way to top up my grain consumption.

Maiolicagirl

My grand mother use cook something similar But each time it use to be of different variety to break the monotony. At times a new and appealing thing used to be created. She also once cooked brown unpolished hand pounded rice with hand pounded wheat .The grains soaked for few hours and then cooked with some fresh shredded cabbage and carrots .She then use to season it with a coarse powder of roasted sesame and poppy seeds along with some walnuts .Drizzling the dish with a dab of fresh home made butter. It tasted great !!

Ashish Naithani

This looks great! I love the idea of mixing millet with different types of rice!

hadley

This looks really interesting...I especially like the arancini idea.

Teri @ Make A Whisk

This sounds great & will definitely plan on trying. As for the issue with being able to rinse all the grains; would a dal strainer work? I frequently prepare several various dal recipes with beans, peas, etc of various sizes and I have a strainer with interchangeable graduated screens (each one finer than the one before). Its gets about as fine as a window screen, would this work for rinsing the amaranth? HS: Give it a try Nichole - you'll know right away :)

Nichole Gunderson

Oh, yeah I know exactly what you are talking about! I love how it adds interesting textures and makes the rice look pretty. I like to eat plain or with a pinch of salt.

Kitchen M

i'm a big fan of Kashi seven grain pilaf, but it's hard for me to find, and overpackaged to boot. But my kids love it sweet or savory so I buy it when I can find it. This looks like a great substitute and I don't have to do any of the figuring out. Thanks Heidi.

meggan

I'm glad you said that about the amaranth and strainer. I'm always wondering, what am I doing wrong here and should I bother rinsing these?? Lately I've been soaking my grains overnight with a splash of apple cider vinegar. They turn out more fluffy and sweet the next day when I cook 'em, and are easier to digest.

Michelle @ Find Your Balance

The combination of grains sounds great! It's gluten free too! Normally, I don't like cooked amaranth on it's own, too gluey when it's cooked. But I think this mix will work. I've also tried to mix grains with dried beans. I found that soaking the grains and beans for 2-3 hours can ensure even cooking. Heidi, have you tried popped amaranth? I'm looking for more ideas for popped amaranth, right now, I only eat it with cereal...

Quinny

Thanks, this will encourage me to try millet and amaranth again. Can't handle them on their own.

Anonymous

wow, i never thought of combining grains before! yum.

veggievixen

Comments are closed.

Apologies, comments are closed.

More Recipes

Popular Ingredients

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of its User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

101 Cookbooks is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. Any clickable link to amazon.com on the site is an affiliate link.