101 Cookbooks https://www.101cookbooks.com When you own over 100 cookbooks, it is time to stop buying, and start cooking. This site chronicles a cookbook collection, one recipe at a time. Wed, 03 Mar 2021 01:18:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.1 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/cropped-101fav-1-32x32.png 101 Cookbooks https://www.101cookbooks.com 32 32 146864163 Sunny Citrus Recipes + How to Use Lots of Citrus https://www.101cookbooks.com/citrus-recipes/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/citrus-recipes/#comments Sat, 27 Feb 2021 01:34:38 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9926 Favorite citrus recipes and all the ways I put a big box of citrus to use this week. Oranges, Meyer and Eureka lemons, mandarins, and grapefruits are all in the mix.

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The abundance of homegrown citrus this time of year in Los Angeles is a peak reason I love being a Californian. You see front yard Meyer lemon trees groaning with yellow orbs. Pomelos and grapefruits frame driveways, and trees impossibly heavy with oranges regularly warrant a double-take. Being surround with this much citrus is happy-making. Especially if you can get your hands on it. And did I ever. My dad’s neighbors generously dropped off a huge crate of Meyers, mandarins, oranges, and Eureka lemons the other day – a legit “bend with your knees” box. So here I am jotting down the ways I’ve been using it, saving it, and the citrus recipes I’ve been making all week.

Ginger Grapefruit Curd

A Week in Citrus

I thought I’d start by talking through everything I’ve done with citrus in the past week. It has been a mix! I’ll include recipes down below for the pastes and syrups.

  • Kosho: I started a batch of Meyer lemon kosho. Kosho is traditionally a spicy, fermented Japanese Yuzu paste, but because lemons are more plentiful here, I tend to use them.
  • Citrus Peel Pastes: I also blended Meyer lemon, Eureka, and orange peels into a number of quick (unfermented) pastes, and froze them in single use quantities. I’ll write up the recipes down below. I use them to season and boost everything! From pastas and soups to rice bowls and roasted vegetable tacos.
  • Most of the mandarins were simply peeled and popped into mouths, but a few have made it into my favorite citrus salad (I’ll highlight that down below).
  • Meyer Lemon & Rose Geranium No-heat Syrup: I love the intensity of no-heat syrups, and made a thick, intensely flavored Meyer lemon syrup by massaging lots of lemon peel with sugar and rose geranium leaves.
  • Orange No-heat Syrup: Same process as the lemon syrup, but kept it to orange peel here. See the recipe below.
  • Citrus Ice Cubes: After peeling citrus and making pastes or syrups, all of the juice was frozen in ice cube trays for future use in drinks, granitas, soups, etc.

Favorite Citrus Salad from Super Natural Simple Cookbook

My Favorite Citrus Salad

I love this salad. It has a mix of citrus segments, peanuts, red onions, a few saffron threads and almond extract along with good olive oil. The recipe is in Super Natural Simple which will be out next month. There’s more information (and so many good soups & salads) here.

Oranges Being Peeled

How To Efficiently Peel Citrus

Ok, let’s talk about peeling citrus. There was a lot of it going on this week. Peeling citrus isn’t a quick task. Know that going in, and you’ll enjoy the process much more. I basically have three moves (see below). 1. Start with clean, dry citrus, and slice citrus from top to bottom in wide slabs. Some peelers work well at this stage, but I often just use a knife. 2. Trim all the bitter pith away. To do this, keep the peel flat agains the cutting board, and trim away from yourself. 3. Scrape any remaining pith from peel with the dull or “flip-side” of a knife.
How To Peel Citrus

What about the Juice?

Lots of peel means lots of juice. Sometimes we just drink it, or use it over the coming days. But, if you freeze the juice in ice cube trays you end up with easy to thaw portions for use in dressing, granitas, soups, curries – basically any place where you can imagine a sunny citrus boost!

Meyer Lemon Ice Cubes

So Many Ways To Use Citrus Peel Pastes

Citrus peel pastes are fragrant flavor blasts. You can make them as simple or complex as you want. I tend to keep mine pretty straightforward, but love the addition of garlic – quite a lot of it. You might add spice blends, mix citruses, you could use other oils in place of olive oil, etc. Here’s how I put them to use after making them:

Orange & Garlic Citrus Paste (recipe below) is super garlicky and was amazing combined with a healthy amount of cayenne pepper, water, and coconut milk to make a beautiful broth for soba noodles – season with more salt to taste to make it just right. I also put a dollop on my lunchtime chana masala and loved the way it brightened everything up. It was also incredibly good dolloped on top of a bowl of this Fire Broth Noodle Soup. And lastly, I used it as a finishing accent on roasted vegetable tacos (cauliflower & mushroom) on homemade corn tortillas. Orange & Garlic Citrus Paste is pictured below.

Meyer Lemon & Garlic Citrus Paste (recipe below) was perfect tossed with a bowl of pan-fried golden artichoke hearts. The next day I tossed a generous amount  of the citrus paste with hot noodles, extra olive oil, pasta water, lots of scallions, a bit of torn mozzarella, herbs and broccoli – so good! And it was the perfect slather across the top of a simple buckwheat and gruyere crepe the other night. 
Orange Peel and Garlic Paste in a Blender

No-Heat Citrus Peel Syrups

Heating fruit changes the flavor profile. As I mentioned up above,  I love the intensity, and uncooked clarity that rings through citrus peel syrups. Made by patiently massaging citrus peels with sugar and leaving to macerate, you strain and end up with an intense, full-bodied syrup to use in countless ways. A favorite this week was an easy drinking dark rum cocktail made with a splash of orange syrup, a shot of dark rum, shaken with tons of ice and topped off with pampelmousse La Croix, and a kiss of lime juice.

Bottle of Homemade Meyer Lemon Syrup
Making Homemade Orange Syrup

Cookbooks Focused on Citrus Recipes

Citri – I love this little 60-ish page cookbook zine by Loria Stern. I’ve encountered Loria and her beautiful creations a number of times since moving to Los Angeles (thanks to Jessica & Joanna), and she made sure I had Citri at the perfect time – peak citrus season. It’s a love letter to citrus with 25 bright and brilliant recipes.
Citri Cookbook with Pink Cover and Yellow Spiral Binding 

Also, have a look at Citrus : Sweet and Savory Sun-Kissed Recipes by Valerie Aikman-Smith and Victoria Pearson, Pucker: A Cookbook for Citrus Lovers by Gwendolyn Richards, and also Citrus: 150 Recipes Celebrating the Sweet and the Sour by Catherine Phipps. 

More Citrus Recipes from the Archives

There are a lot of citrus-centric recipes in the 101 archives, and I’ll put them in the related searches below, but these two recipes have been exceptionally popular over the years. A few years back, I also linked out to a bunch of great winter citrus recipes here.
Candied Citrus Pops
Candied Citrus Lollipops: Two-ingredient magic. Plump, juicy, citrus segments coated in thin, crunchy, sugar shells. They’re the perfect, delightful sweet treat.
Citrus Salt
A Spectrum of Citrus Salts: Citrus salts made from all sorts of winter citrus zest – clementines, wild lime, Meyer lemon, kalamansi oranges, and mandarinquats. Couldn’t be simpler.

Let me know your favorite ultra citrus centric recipes and resources. And in the meantime, I hope you find a bit of inspiration here, especially with the citrus peel pastes. Enjoy! -h

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Homemade Cavatelli https://www.101cookbooks.com/cavatelli/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/cavatelli/#comments Sat, 06 Feb 2021 00:28:50 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9903 Simple, homemade cavatelli pasta is a super fun shape to make! Pictured here spiked with turmeric and black pepper, and topped with roasted winter vegetables and Parmesan.

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I spent most of the past four months in Northern California at my dad’s house. After my mom died everyone converged on the house, and in short order a lot of other things fell apart. No one went home for a long time. I made some strange decisions about what to bring when I loaded the car that initial morning – watercolors, a stack of cookbooks, my camera, a favorite knife, a huge bin full of spices. I thought about bringing my favorite donabe, but was worried it could break and grabbed my pasta machine instead. Not a bad call – a lot of pasta was made! My nephew is especially enthusiastic about it, so I decided to branch out to a new shape – cavatelli.
Homemade Cavatelli Pasta
The move to cavatelli was partially out of necessity. My workhorse, the Atlas pasta machine, has issues at my dad’s house. There is nothing to clamp it on to. Every countertop and table is too thick. It’s maddening. I noticed the clamp on the cavatelli maker seemed like it might be wider, so I thought we’d try it instead. It is also worth mentioning, I’ve been meaning to buy a cavatelli maker for years. Ragazza, a sweet little Italian spot, was just up the street from where we lived in San Francisco. The owner Sharon tipped me off to how she made their cavatelli from scratch with a little hand-cranked machine (something like this one) – and I’ve meant to get my hands on once since. This seemed like the right time.
Pasta Dough Rolled thin for Cavatelli

About this Cavatelli Recipe

After a good amount of experimenting, I’ve settled on the following as my basic cavatelli dough and technique. Once you master it, the variations you can explore are endless (see below). The cavatelli machine likes pasta dough that’s not-too-wet and not-too-dry. If you hit the sweet spot, you’ll be able to crank out a pound of cavatelli incredibly quickly. If your dough is getting stuck in your machine, pat it with flour, dust off any excess, and try again. You’ll eventually get a feel for it!
Homemade Cavatelli and Cavatelli Machine

What if I don’t have a Cavatelli Machine?

Not a big deal! You can make it by hand a number of other ways. Here’s a page that demonstrates how to shape cavatelli with a ridged board, fork, or grater. I’ve also seen it shaped traditionally in Puglia using something like a butter knife.
Close-up Photo of Cavatelli

What Flour Should I Use?

Cavatelli is traditionally made with durum wheat semolina flour. But, if you don’t have that on hand, don’t let it stop you. Last week I was out of semolina flour, so the cavatelli you see pictured here was made with “00” flour. “00” is powder-fine and made with low gluten, soft wheat flour. If you don’t have “00” you can certainly use all-purpose flour. A long way of saying, make cavatelli with 100% semolina flour if you have it, or use equal parts “00” and semolina, or just “00″….go for the all-purpose flour if that’s what you have.
Homemade Cavatelli with Roasted Winter Vegetables

How To Freeze Cavatelli

Freezing is my preferred method of storing any cavatelli I’m not cooking immediately. Arrange freshly made, uncooked cavatelli across a floured baking sheet. Try to make sure they’re in a single layer. Freeze for a couple of hours, and then transfer to double layer plastic bags. You can freeze for up to a couple of months. And you can cook straight from the freezer. No need to thaw, just dump the cavatelli into boiling salted water, and increase the cooking time a bit.
Roasted Vegetables

Cavatelli Variations

In the recipe below you can see how you can tweak basic cavatelli pasta dough by adding different seasonings and spices. I wanted to make a bright, sunny plate of pasta with lots of roasted yellow and orange vegetables and ingredients like cauliflower, golden yellow beets, and winter squash (pictured above). I added turmeric and black pepper to the pasta dough for a little flavor, color, and boost. The possibilities are endless here.
Homemade Cavatelli Pasta

You can also play around with the water. In place of water you can use vegetable juices, purees, stocks or broths, anything of that sort is fair game.Close-up Photo of Homemade Cavatelli Pasta
Making fresh pasta is one of my favorite things to do. It’s even better when you have others around to help, taking turns in shifts. I did a basic primer on making homemade pasta a while ago, if you love fettuccine noodles or anything along those lines, start there. You can also try making gnocchi (it’s perfect with this pesto), here’s a beautiful beet fettuccine, and a favorite simple tomato sauce. And all my pasta recipes live here. Enjoy!

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Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash https://www.101cookbooks.com/sourdough-galette-with-delicata-squash/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/sourdough-galette-with-delicata-squash/#comments Sat, 30 Jan 2021 02:14:56 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9885 A fully loaded winter sourdough galette topped with delicata squash, green chile yogurt, shallots, and scallions.

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What you see here is a fully loaded winter galette. I started making it a few months back inspired by a recipe in Sarah Owens’ masterful Sourdough book. Her whole-grain boosted sourdough crust caught my attention. I also didn’t need convincing related to the garlic-spiked labneh slathered beneath summery toppings. I don’t need to tell most of you, as I type this, we are a long way from summer.

Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash
Sarah’s galette was loaded with beautiful tomatoes, but by the time I spotted her recipe, tomatoes were long gone for the year. My tart needed to be more of a winter affair, and the delicata squash and shallots I had on hand seemed a natural evolution. I’ve baked this galette four or five times since, and it’s omg-so-good. If you love savory tarts this is for you. And please don’t sweat it if you don’t maintain a sourdough starter, I’ll note a couple alternative paths you can take down below.
Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash

Make it Easy!

This galette is a bit of a project if you start from zero at late in the evening with dinner as your intention. Pre-make most of the components when you have a few minutes here or there in the days prior, and it will come together effortlessly when you’re ready to bake the finale.

What Can you Do Ahead of Time?

You can make the dough for the crust and freeze or refrigerate. You can pre-make the yogurt spread in five minutes – total breeze. And if you roast the delicata and shallots the night before (or have them as a component of your meal that day) you can use the leftovers on the galette.

All the Toppings for a Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash

What If You Don’t Have Sourdough Starter?

Here’a another tart crust I love – you can simply swap in this one. Alternately, you can follow the recipe below omitting the sourdough starter, and adding and extra 25g of ice water and 25g flour in its place. Adjust with a bit of extra water or flour depending on the feel of the dough. If you want to maintain your own sourdough starter, there are endless books, and tutorials on how to do that, or you might ask your local bakery if they could spare a bit of theirs instead of starting from scratch!

Garlic and Green Chile Spiked Yogurt

Kitchen Scales are the Best!

This recipe is written in weights (I meant to convert for volumes, but ran out time trying to pop off photos before it got dark! Apologies). If you bake a lot, I’m sure you’ve heard it before, a kitchen scale is a godsend. I love my Escali Primo, it costs roughly $20, and will last a long, long time. This tart dough has volume measurements if you are scale-less. Both are buttery, rich and crowd-pleasers.
Close-up Photo of Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash
Extra credit! I love the cute, tiny seeds inside delicata squash, you can see them pictured here. Pre-roast them tossed with a bit of olive oil in a hot oven, and then sprinkle them on everything from tarts and salads, pastas and pizzas. It’s a bit of a pain to clean the gunk off them, but worth the extra effort.
Individual Slice of Sourdough Galette with Delicata Squash
I hope you all like this one, I was so excited to see how many of you made stunning braided breads! Xo to Sarah for the inspiration! 

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Braided Onion Bread https://www.101cookbooks.com/braided-onion-bread/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/braided-onion-bread/#comments Fri, 15 Jan 2021 02:17:42 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9855 This braided onion bread is made with a rich, buttery, yeast-based dough. Each of the four strands in the braid is stuffed with a caramelized onion and grated cheese mixture.

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One of my first memories related to baking was a demonstration conducted at my kindergarten where bread dough was shaped into turtles, and birds, and elaborate braids. Scissors were used to create the tiny bread spikes on the backs of alligator and hedgehog-shaped loaves. Lobster claws got a snip up the center for visual effect and each figure was placed in an oven until puffy, golden, and fragrant. We were each allowed to take one home. The whole experience blew my five year-old mind. Braided Onion Bread filled With Caramelized Onions and Gruyere Cheese
I still like to bake elaborate braided loaves. Especially when things in my life are tumultuous. I made this one a couple of times prior to the holidays, and decided to make it again last week to photograph and share with you. It’s made with a rich, buttery, yeast-based dough. Each of the four strands in the braid is stuffed with a caramelized onion and grated cheese mixture. If you’ve never baked a braided loaf before, I’ll admit that stuffing the strands adds a layer of complexity, but the whole process is incredibly forgiving if you commit and keep going. If you look at the shape below and think “no way” just remember it’s a simple braid coiled into a snail shape. 
Braided Onion Bread Prior to Baking

The (Stuffed) Braided Bread Process

To make this bread you start by making beautiful yeast dough. You roll your dough into a rectangle, cut that rectangle into four strips, and then stuff each strand with awesomeness. I usually prepare the stuffing a day ahead of time, or the morning of the day I plan on baking. This gives the filling some time to cool. I’ve locked onto this onion-cheese combo lately, but you can imagine endless variations.

To fill the dough, you run the filling in a line up the middle of each of the four strips of dough. Fold them each in half, and then pinch the seam to seal the filling in. Now you have four filled strands that you’ll arrange side-by-side (below). Pinch them together at the top and start braiding (see diagram below). Coil the braid into a tight round, snail shape, let the dough rise, brush with an egg wash, and bake! 

Diagram of a Four Strand Braid

A Four-strand Braid

First, let me say – if you’re worried about trying the four-strand braid, I understand! If you want to fall back to a chubby three-strand bread braid the first time through, go for it. The main thing is to commit to the braid either way. Even if you’re convinced things aren’t going well. This feeling can be triggered by a few things. A common problem is strands splitting open to reveal the filling – just re-pinch and keep going. Or, you might feel like your strands keep stretching and getting longer and longer? It’s ok, you will coil them into a round shape. Keep braiding even if your strands are longer than your sheet pan. Boss the dough around a bit. If it’s too sticky, dust with a bit of flour. The main thing? Don’t get discouraged, keep going.

Braided Onion Bread filled With Caramelized Onions and Gruyere Cheese just After Baking
Please let me know if you bake a braided loaf, or send me a message on Insta. Or if you experiment with other fillings, please leave a comment. I can’t wait to see what you do with this one. I loved seeing all of you posting soup pics last week. xo – h

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Fire Broth Noodle Soup https://www.101cookbooks.com/fire-broth-noodle-soup/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/fire-broth-noodle-soup/#comments Thu, 07 Jan 2021 22:04:37 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9830 This is the soup that saved me after my dad came home from the hospital recently. It's loaded with good things like beans, greens, and pasta and the broth is spicy and invigorating with lots of pepper, garlic, ginger, and chiles.

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This is the soup that saved me after my dad came home from the hospital recently. I made the first pot on the fly, loading it up with all the things that make me feel good (beans, pasta, kale, turmeric), and seasoning it just the way I like it with a broth that is nuclear spicy (cayenne, ginger, garlic). All the ingredients went into the largest pot I could find, one of my dad’s pasta pots, so there would be enough soup to portion out and freeze into meals for days. It’s the kind of soup I never get tired of, and the kind of thing I needed to have on hand to keep myself going at a terrible time. For any of you who missed what has been going on with me between my past post and now, I posted more details here and here, but the short of it is that my mom died unexpectedly, and my dad has also been very sick. 
Fire Broth Noodle Soup
But the soup has helped. The soup does the job. And somewhat shockingly, my dad also loves it. He lost nearly fifty pounds in a short time period while he was in the hospital and acute rehab. Swallowing was hard, and radiation treatment to his throat caused all sorts of problems. I wasn’t sure if he could tolerate this soup, because spicy foods can be trouble when you’re not eating much and/or getting radiation treatment to your neck. At any rate, he asked to try it and now he requests for bowl after bowl of this, preferably with a dollop of sour cream on top or a bit of grated Parmesan cheese. He calls it, “that spicy soup.” My English brother-in-law saw how much chopped kale is added, and nicknamed it “hot salad.” Laugh/cry. We make a big pot every week.

The Noodles:

Any short, substantial noodles will do here. I started by using farfalle pasta (butterflies), and when those ran out, I switched to egg noodles – the kind you might use in a kugel. I wouldn’t hesitate to use gemelli or fusilli.

The Beans:

My preference is cranberry beans. I made the first two pots of this with these. But don’t get hung up if you don’t have cranberry beans. Chickpeas are also a win, you could try a favorite white bean, or a blend it also good. I always cook up a pound of dried beans before making this soup, but you can certainly make it with canned, and I’ll leave notes in the recipe to reflect this.

Fire Broth Noodle Soup

The Spices:

My advice here is to roll with what you have on hand. You likely have much of what you need. The objective? An assertively spicy, balanced broth. I call for cayenne pepper here, but I’ve also made this soup substituting an equal amount of Szechuan pepper, and it was all good. If you’re concerned about the soup being too spicy, scale back a bit on any ingredient you’re nervous about, and salt and season with more toward the end of cooking. This way, the seasoning will be exactly to your liking.

Fire Broth Noodle Soup

Use a Big Pot:

The main thing to know is you need to use a very large pot here. This recipe makes a lot of soup. I make it in a big pasta or stock pot. Just keep in mind, in addition to all your ingredients, you’ll add 14 cups of water. If you don’t have a large enough pot, cut the recipe in half (or do 3/4 of the recipe) to be safe.

Stretching Out Leftovers:

You’ll have leftovers for days with this recipe. That’s part of the magic here. Keep some refrigerated for the coming day or two, and freeze the rest in smaller portions. You might want to add more water to the soup upon reheating – it tends to thickens up. Be sure to pre-season with more salt and cayenne before serving, after re-heating.

A Couple Variations:

With tomatoes! If you have canned whole tomatoes on hand, you can add them to this soup. Scale back the amount of water called for by a couple of cups and use a pair of culinary scissors to cut the tomatoes into smaller pieces while they’re still in the can (pro-tip), add along with the beans, water, etc.

Different Spice Profile: I made this last night, but was out of ginger. I keep everything else as written in the recipe below, but added the tomatoes I just mentioned, and lots of chana masala spice mixture – a few tablespoons. It was A-plus! So good. You could experiment with garam masala instead, or whatever you keep on hand!

Please enjoy the soup. It takes a good amount of chopping, but the payoff is rich. And I wanted to extend another heartfelt thank you for all your notes, support and condolences. I’m looking forward and hoping for more bright spots for all of us in 2021. -h

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Spicy Tempeh Crumble Bowl https://www.101cookbooks.com/spicy-tempeh-crumble-bowl/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/spicy-tempeh-crumble-bowl/#comments Sat, 26 Dec 2020 00:07:11 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9138 A riff on one of my favorite recipes in Andrea Nguyen's Vietnamese Food Any Day - a caramelized tempeh crumble. The sort of thing that immediately becomes the best component in your rice bowl.

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Today’s recipe is a riff one of my favorites from Andrea Nguyen’s most recent book, Vietnamese Food Any Day. It’s a caramelized tempeh crumble, the sort of thing that immediately becomes the best component in your rice bowl. If you’re on the fence about tempeh, this is the place to start.

Spicy Tempeh Crumble Bowl

What is Tempeh?

Tempeh is a fermented whole food, soy-based, and much loved in traditional Indonesian culture. To make tempeh, soybeans are soaked, partially cooked, combined with a starter, and then spread into a layer to allow fermentation to take place. A lot goes on at this stage, and you can read a more detailed play-by-play about tempeh production here. Soybean tempeh is most common, but other variations are also available. You also might see tempeh combined with other power ingredients like flax, or other grains.

Andrea acknowledges that tempeh isn’t a traditional Viet ingredient, but she uses it in banh mi, pho, and crumbles like this one to mimic meat, “when crumbled into small pieces…tempeh absorbs the seasonings well and fries up nicely.”
Spicy Tempeh Crumble Bowl

Why Tempeh is such a Power Food

Tempeh is widely considered a powerhouse ingredient because it is rich in a good range of nutrients. It also weighs in nicely on fiber, antioxidant, and protein fronts. Add to that the fermentation factor (basically, the fermentation helps with nutrient absorption, and digestibility) and you have a food that is working for you, not against. A lot of people like to substitute tempeh in place of something meaty. For example, this tempeh crumble might take the place of a pork crumble. Here’s where you can find more tempeh recipes, and I also like this list of tempeh benefits on McKel’s Nutrition Stripped Site. More tempeh in 2020!

The Tempeh Crumble recipe

In Andrea’s version she uses 1/2 cup of chopped lemongrass. The lemongrass adds beautifully fragrant citrus notes, and is one of my favorite flavors. That said, the times I was in a hurry to make dinner, I found myself skipping out on the 1/2 cup of chopped lemongrass (the lemongrass in my yard is crazy tough) and repeatedly making this shortcut version. It uses serrano chiles and extra green onions – still really tasty, just quicker to throw together.
Spicy Tempeh Crumble Bowl

Ways to Use the Tempeh Crumble

Here (above) you see the tempeh crumble as a component in a rice bowl. The basic components are rice and the tempeh crumble plus what ever is on easy and on hand in the refrigerator or pantry. I grabbed peanuts, some garden lettuces, cucumber, pickled carrots, and avocado. A dollop of guacamole wouldn’t be unwelcome. The crumble would also be great on these Vegan Nachos, in these Garlic Lime Lettuce Wraps, or in place of the tempeh in this Taco Salad.

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Heirloom Bean and Mushroom “Carnitas” Casserole https://www.101cookbooks.com/rancho-gordo-heirloom-bean-and-mushroom-carnitas-casserole/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/rancho-gordo-heirloom-bean-and-mushroom-carnitas-casserole/#comments Fri, 25 Dec 2020 01:30:11 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9093 A favorite Rancho Gordo heirloom bean casserole recipe. The smell of garlic and herbs baking alongside the beans, simmering tomatoes, and mushrooms will bring neighbors in off the sidewalk.

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What you see here is an excellent, hearty, winter-spirited casserole. It’s simple to pull together, and once in the oven the smell of garlic and herbs baking alongside the heirloom beans, simmering tomatoes, and golden mushrooms will bring neighbors in off the sidewalk. You should make it a.s.a.p!

I found the recipe deep in back of Rancho Gordo Vegetarian Kitchen cookbook – (Rancho Gordo forever around here). The technique for cooking the mushrooms is part of what caught my attention. You cook the mushrooms in quite a bit of liquid and then allow them to cook in the residual fat (olive oil) after the liquid evaporates. The technique is like carnitas, the classic Mexican pork dish. Hence the recipe title. But, of course, unlike the traditional preparation, cooking this with mushrooms makes it a vegetarian casserole.  Heirloom Bean and Mushroom Carnitas Casserole

Choosing the Right Beans

The recipe falls into the Dark & Hearty Beans chapter of the book, and Eye of the Goat beans, or other brown beans are what’s recommended. That said, many, many types of beans could work here. I went a bit rogue and used some beautiful Rancho Gordo Yellow Eye Beans. They’re creamy, melty, and mild. They took on the bubbling casserole juices beautifully. I also love the way those beans in particular hold their markings. Beyond those suggestions, I imagine using any creamy white bean would be nice here too – for example, the Alubia Blanca, or Marcella. And, if you only have canned beans on hand – it’s ok! Drain them, rinse them, use them!
Heirloom Bean and Mushroom Carnitas Casserole

Cooking the Mushrooms

I just wanted to leave a visual reference here. This is how the mushrooms looked (above) when I take them off the heat. And now that I’m looking, I could have even gone a bit longer. Do you see how there’s nice browning on the edges? That’s what you’re after. Then, you add all the other ingredients to the same pan (below), give it all a good stir, add a bit of cheese and pop it in the oven. I’ve tweaked the original recipe a bit to allow you to go from stovetop to oven in one skillet (reflected below), and bumped the quantity up by half, because this casserole is popular and goes fast.

Heirloom Bean and Mushroom Carnitas Casserole

Variations

Here are a couple ways you might build on this idea!

With Breadcrumbs: Toss 1 cup of chunky breadcrumbs with a glut of olive oil and sprinkle across the top of the bean mixture before baking.

Breakfast Casserole: Make three divots in the bean-mushroom mixture prior to baking, crack an egg into each of the depressions & bake until eggs are set, and bean mixture is bubbling.

Heirloom Bean and Mushroom Carnitas Casserole

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Mushroom Scallion Tartine with Poblano Yogurt https://www.101cookbooks.com/mushroom-scallion-tartine/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/mushroom-scallion-tartine/#comments Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:20:08 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/mushroom-scallion-tartine-with-poblano-yogurt-recipe.html A substantial, delicious, mushroom sheet pan sandwich recipe. You roast a bunch of mushrooms and scallions in a hot oven, whip up a simple poblano yogurt while those are roasting. So good!

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I think of this as a sheet pan sandwich recipe. You roast a bunch of mushrooms and scallions in a hot oven as your main components. And you whip up a simple poblano yogurt while those are roasting. Pile everything high on top of hearty slices of well-toasted bread, and you’re set.

Mushroom Scallion Tartine with Poblano Yogurt

The poblano yogurt is a key component here, but I totally understand if you want to skip out on it because of time, lack of poblanos, or you’re anti-chile. No problem, just about any flavor-forward yogurt slather will do in its place. You could simply crush a clove of garlic into some paste with a pinch of salt, and stir that in your favorite plain yogurt – also delicious. Or, whisk a tablespoon of harissa paste into your yogurt.

Mushroom Scallion Tartine with Poblano Yogurt

 

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How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother https://www.101cookbooks.com/pesto-recipe/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/pesto-recipe/#comments Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:19:51 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/001570.html The real deal. A vibrant pesto recipe taught to me by my friend Francesca's mother who came to visit from Genoa, Italy - hand-chopped basil, garlic, Parmesan, olive oil and pine nuts.

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If you’ve ever tasted pesto in Italy you know that the pesto here in the United States just isn’t the same. I received a lesson in how to make pesto from a real Italian grandmother last week and now I understand the difference and what makes this pesto recipe so special.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

A Special Pesto

My friend Francesca makes the trip from her small town near the pesto-epicenter of Genoa, Italy to San Francisco once or twice a year – this time (lucky for us) she brought her mom and two-year old son Mattia. Her mom makes a beautiful pesto (and perfectly light, potato gnocchi to go along with it) and offered to show me and my friend Jen how it is done. I have to say, it was a complete game-changer. If you love pesto, you really have to try this. Her technique results in an incredibly special pesto.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

Chop by hand or blender?

Most of the pesto you encounter here in the U.S. is different for a few reasons. First off, most of what you see is made by machine, usually a food processor or hand blender. This holds true even if it is homemade. Don’t get me wrong, it usually tastes good, but because the ingredients aren’t hand chopped you end up with a texture that is more like like a moist paste and there little to no definition between ingredients.

During my lesson I quickly began to realize chopping all the ingredients by hand and not blending them is key because this prevents the ingredients from becoming a completely homogenized emulsion or paste. When you dress a pasta with a pesto that has been hand chopped the minuscule flecks of basil will separate from the olive oil in places, you get definition between ingredients, and bright flavors pop in a way they don’t when they’ve been blended into one.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

Choosing the right basil

Another thing, Genovese pesto is famous in part because it is often made with young, small basil leaves. For us non-Italians it is easy to find Genovese basil in stores and at farmer’s markets particularly in the summer, but chances are it wasn’t picked young. I wouldn’t worry about it too much, simply by hand chopping all your ingredients, you will see a major shift in personality of your pesto. If you grow your own basil, I’m envious.
How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

The technique

If you’re serious about making good pesto, using this technique, get a good, sharp (preferably large, single blade) mezzaluna, or a good knife – you’ll need it. Chopping the ingredients will take twenty minutes or so. Whatever you use to chop, make sure it has a sharp blade or the basil will turn dark. Once you chop your ingredients, you’ll form them into a cake, pictured above. You add olive oil to this cake, and it’s magic – below. 

How to Make Pesto like an Italian Grandmother

How to Store Pesto

Store any pesto you might use in the next day or two, refrigerated, under a thin film of olive oil. You can also freeze it in snack-sized baggies. Thaw and toss with whatever gnocchi, ravioli, or other favorite pasta you like – and a good splash of pasta water!

Let me know if you try this and what you think! Use your beautiful fresh pesto with this gnocchi recipe. Or this simple homemade pasta., or cavatelli. Tutto bene!

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Peace, Love & Energy Dip https://www.101cookbooks.com/peace-love-dip/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/peace-love-dip/#comments Tue, 22 Dec 2020 23:46:46 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9609 The best thing in my refrigerator right now. It’s a dip! An updated version of the virtuous hippie spreads found for decades in California grocery co-ops and farmers’ markets.

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I’m going to share the best thing in my refrigerator right now. It’s a dip, and I can’t get enough of it. If you can imagine an updated version of the virtuous hippie spreads found for decades in California grocery co-ops and farmers’ markets — that’s what I was going for. The base is a trifecta of creamy ripe avocado, nuts (cashews or almonds), and chickpeas. Citrus juice kicks in with acidity from orange and lime. And I raided the spice drawer after that – cayenne, curry powder, and ginger all play for keeps here.

Peace, Love & Energy Dip

A Versatile Dip (or Spread!)

This is a hardworking dip. It’s great with baked pita chips, tortilla chips, crackers, etc. It can also play a supporting role in many other ways. It’s a versatile sandwich spread. And I love it slathered across garlic-rubbed grilled flatbreads. It’s A+ inside burritos, or on top of quesadillas. Make a big under swoosh in the bottom your favorite grain bowl and load it up. You can even thin it out with a splash of olive oil, and extra citrus juice for a creamy dressing. 

Peace, Love & Energy Dip

Toppings

I like the idea of using toppings to let people know what they’re eating. So, for example, here you see cashews, chickpeas, and the curry powder. The toppings also add varied texture to the creamy dip. You can use as many or as few as you like, but I do notice the toppings always get scooped up first with this one.

Peace, Love & Energy Dip

Please make this dip, you won’t be sorry 😉 It’s just so good and so versatile. But if you think it might not be your thing — other dips / spreads I love include this vibrant beet caviar, or, of course, great guacamole. Enjoy! xx, -h

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Vegetarian Split Pea Soup https://www.101cookbooks.com/vegetarian-split-pea-soup/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/vegetarian-split-pea-soup/#comments Mon, 21 Dec 2020 19:10:09 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/vegetarian-split-pea-soup-recipe.html A delicious, simple vegetarian split pea soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five!

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Many of you were enthusiastic about the lentil soup recipe I posted a few weeks back. Today’s split pea soup recipe is similar in spirit. It’s a delicious, healthy, textured soup made from an impossibly short list of ingredients. Seriously, just five! No ham hocks in this version, simply green split peas and onions cooked until tender, partially pureed, seasoned and flared out with toppings.
A Really Great Vegetarian Split Pea Soup
Like many lentil soups, this one delivers many of the same nutritional benefits – a good amount of vegetable protein and plenty of staying power. It is hearty and filling, and even better reheated later in the day. You can find dried split green peas in many natural foods stores, I picked these up in the bin section at Whole Foods Market.
A Really Great Vegetarian Split Pea Soup

Split Pea Soup: Finishing Touches

I like to finish each bowl with a generous drizzle of golden olive oil, a few flecks of lemon zest, and a dusting of smoked paprika to give the soup some smoky depth. If you have scallions or toasted nuts on hand (pictured), great! Toss some on as well.

Hope you enjoy the soup, and for those of you who have never tried split peas, this might be the time to give them a go! 

Variations

A number of you had great suggestions for tweaks and variations in the comments. Here are a couple that stood out.

Renae took the soup in a more herb-forward direction. “This soup is divine. I added fennel and sage to give it a warmer texture. Used almond milk to thin it out while blending.”

Jesper noted, “Great looking soup. Instead of using cubed bouillon, I use the water left over from cooking chick peas. Usually I cook them with an onion, a garlic clove or two, black pepper corns and a bay leaf. The result is a lightly flavored vegetable stock, and it freezes well, too.”

I like Christine’s style, “I like to add a few garnishes like chopped fresh marjoram, oregano, thyme and a good dash of hot sauce! Sometimes a swirl of hot mustard is great too.”

And if you’re looking for more lentil or pulse based soups, I really love this Coconut Red Lentil Soup, and this Green Lentil Soup with Curried Brown Butter

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Bryant Terry’s Amazing Green Rice https://www.101cookbooks.com/green-rice/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/green-rice/#comments Mon, 21 Dec 2020 00:41:35 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/?p=9204 A very special green rice. A blender of green juice made from kale, spinach, and a creamy stock is cooked with onions, garlic, green pepper, and long-grain rice. It all cooks together into an intensely green and fragrant pot of fluffy grains.

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Hi all, I hope everyone is hanging in there during all of this uncertainty. I’ve been trying to stay off my phone and focus instead on doing things that are positive and productive close to home. There’s a lot of cooking and baking going on and I wanted to share this gem of a recipe. It’s an amazing green rice from Bryant Terry’s new book, Vegetable Kingdom. If you’ve got some greens on hand, and some rice, you must, must, must make it. It really is so good. A blender of green juice made from kale, spinach, and a creamy stock is cooked with onions, garlic, green pepper, and long-grain rice. It all cooks together into an intensely green and fragrant pot of fluffy grains.

Bryant Terry's Amazing Green Rice

Give it a Try, Really!

Let me just also say, I know some of you are shy about cooking rice.  Even if you think you’re no good at cooking it, push those thoughts aside and give this recipe a try. It’s worth a go. Because even if you don’t nail your rice perfectly, close enough is good enough here, and you can make adjustment based on your experience the next time around! Also, consider doubling the recipe while you’re at it, its a great way to up your greens consumption. I’m going to list the ways I’ve been using this green rice for leftovers below.
Bryant Terry's Amazing Green Rice

Green Rice Leftover Ideas

There are so many(!) things you can do with leftover green rice. Here are a few to consider.

Fried rice: Cook day-old rice in a skillet with extra garlic, a bit of chopped up omelette, a bit of tofu, maybe add a handful of broccoli?

Onigiri: Shape the green rice into chubby triangles and pan-fry until crusted and golden. You can even tuck a bit of tofu or a few edamame into the center for added surprise.

Green Burrito with Guacamole: Do a version of this quinoa burrito, but use this green rice in place of the quinoa.

Green Rice Soup: Make a green version of this rice soup (I actually made this for dinner last night) – basically thin the rice out to desired consistency with stock or water, season, and go from there with toppings, etc.

Green Rice Cakes: Whisk an egg or two into the rice (1 for each cup of rice), shape into patties and pan-fry into rice cakes.

Whole Grain Green Rice: Do a version using brown basmati or brown jasmine rice. Up the liquid, and cooking time a bit based on the rice you’re using, and package instructions.
Bryant Terry author of Vegetable Kingdom

Topping Ideas

It’s all about the crunch here. Toasted nuts, crispy shallots, toasted nori, citrus zest, sesame seeds, crumbled kale chips.
Bryant Terry author of Vegetable Kingdom
More ways to find Bryant! On Instagram, his site, on Twitter.

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Black Sticky Gingerbread https://www.101cookbooks.com/black-sticky-gingerbread/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/black-sticky-gingerbread/#comments Fri, 18 Dec 2020 20:00:30 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/000864.html This black sticky gingerbread recipe makes an outrageously dark, dense, flavorful and delicious cake. The burnt-caramel-esque crust that forms on the top of the cake is part of what makes this recipe a keeper.

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I’ve experimented with a good number of gingerbread recipes in the years since I highlighted Regan Daley’s Black Sticky Gingerbread. There were single, double, and triple ginger gingerbreads. Cakes that were spice-kissed, and others with experience at first and second base. They’re all good, really. But hers is the one I keep coming back to when it counts. And because it has been hiding in the archives for so long, I thought I’d run my updated version today complete with tweaks, and fresh insights. Please enjoy!
Black Sticky Gingerbread Dusted with Powdered Sugar
Back then, here’s what I said, “…The Black Sticky Gingerbread comes together like the cake that it is – straight-forward, unfussy, with a bit of kick and attitude. Melt the butter with the sweeteners, stir in a few eggs, fold in the fragrant spices and flour, spike it with some freshly grated ginger, and pour the batter into the prepared pan. The cake is outrageously dark, dense, flavorful, and delicious. Not the prettiest cake you’ll ever make, but one of the tastiest. The burnt-caramel-esque crust that forms on the top of the cake is outrageous, and that was the first part of the cake to go.”Black Sticky Gingerbread Dusted with Powdered Sugar

What is the Best Gingerbread Pan?

I’ve baked this gingerbread cake in a range of pans over the years. Honestly, it’s hard to go wrong. You might have to adjust the baking time depend on what you’re using. Less time if you’re baking in muffin or cupcake tins, or longer if you’re using a sheet pan or large bundt pan. There is guidance in the recipe notes. This is just a long way of saying, experiment!

Black Sticky Gingerbread

Your Gingerbread Suggestions

A number of you have left insightful comments over the years, and I wanted to highlight a few here. Kelly noted,” I made this for Christmas dinner this year with homemade lemon curd and it was fabulous!” There has been success swapping in gluten-free flour for the flour. And Haruspex loaded it up saying, “I halved the recipe, made it in a loaf pan, added a fistful of sherry-soaked chopped dates & raisins and another of chopped walnuts, and brought it to a New Year’s Eve party.” Have fun, I’d love to know if any of you give this a try over the holidays, or if you make any other personalized tweaks to it! xo -h

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Sparkling Cranberries https://www.101cookbooks.com/sparkling-cranberries-recipe/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/sparkling-cranberries-recipe/#comments Tue, 01 Dec 2020 18:00:49 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/sparkling-cranberries-recipe.html Around the holidays these pretty, sugared, sparkling cranberries are perfect. Tart and sweet, they glint and wink in the surrounding holiday lights, and lend a striking dash of red to the table.

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I’ve become convinced that these sparkling, sugared cranberries should be a part of every holiday spread. They glint and wink in the surrounding holiday lights, and lend a striking dash of red to the table. Another great thing is the way they effortlessly make the transition from savory course to sweet. So, for example, I’ve become fond of serving them as part of a cheese spread, but I imagine they’d be nice as the finishing touch on on a tart or clustered atop a crème brûlée or pudding of some sort.
Sparkling Cranberries Recipesparkling_cranberries2.jpg

What Type of Sugar?

This is key, and I’ve experimented with a range of sugars here. Some work better than others. In the beginning, I wanted to make them with a maple sugar coating – but the cranberries looked like they had been dropped in dust. The same goes for raw cane sugar, coconut sugar, and Rapadura. So I gave up trying to do a less refined sugar version. Take note, extra-fine grain sugar didn’t work well either – clumpy. Essentially, the best way to get a good sparkling sugar crust on your cranberries is to first roll them in an slightly-chunky organic sugar (something like this), and later toss them in regular granulated sugar. The small grains of the granulated sugar cling to any spots that are still sticky from the simple syrup.
Sparkling Cranberries Recipe

They are simple to make, but you need to do the first step the night before. I like to toss the cranberries in sugar the next morning, and off and on throughout the day so they have time to dry and crisp up. Enjoy, and happiest holidays!

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Simple Whole Wheat Sugar Cookies https://www.101cookbooks.com/whole-wheat-sugar-cookies/ https://www.101cookbooks.com/whole-wheat-sugar-cookies/#comments Mon, 30 Nov 2020 17:00:04 +0000 https://www.101cookbooks.com/wp101/archives/simple-whole-wheat-sugar-cookies-recipe.html This is the recipe I use anytime I want perfect sugar cookies. Great flavor, and the dough is a dream to work with.

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This is the recipe I use anytime I want perfect sugar cookies. They bake up beautifully with nice structure and a hint of snap when you break them in two. Especially true if you can wait that extra minute or two before taking them from the oven. So they have time to shift from just-plain-baked to golden, crisp, and toasted. The dough is an absolute dream to work with. And the flavor? They have just the right amount of salt to counter the sweet. Simple Whole Wheat Sugar Cookies
This recipe makes enough dough to yield plenty of cookies, with dough left over to freeze. I typically run out of energy before I run out of dough. I thought I’d posted this recipe long ago(!), but a search through the archives proved me wrong! I’m also including the icing I like.

Icing

As far as icing goes, I have a lot of thoughts. 😉 I have a base recipe I use and then tweak it from there. Sometimes, I like my icing somewhat translucent, like a wash – so I add more water. Other times, I want it more opaque, so I leave it as written (below). I always like it to be a bit matte, and not hyper-glossy, so that’s what you’ll get here. Also, have fun with natural colors. You could do tiny hot-pink dots on the trees pictured with some raspberry powder plus a bit of the icing added to it. I like saffron for yellow, matcha for green, etc. Play around!

Simple Whole Wheat Sugar Cookies

Pro-tip! Keep your eyes peeled at yard sales, flea markets, and the like for special cookie cutters – that’s where you’ll find the gems. I have a bin of favorites that I can go to each time I make cookies.

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