My Favorite Pancake

My Favorite Pancake Recipe


We've all had blueberry pancakes with maple syrup, and pancakes with blueberry syrup, but what about a tall stack of golden butter-kissed pancakes with blueberry maple syrup? I'm going to go out on a limb and say these Whole-Grain Pancakes with Blueberry Maple Syrup are the best pancakes I've ever made, my favorite pancake recipe to date. The pancakes are fluffy and golden and light, and the blueberry syrup is delicious, fragrant and beautiful without being overly sweet.

I've been playing around quite a lot recently with white whole wheat flour. It is the Trojan horse of whole-grain flours, because for finicky people who won't eat anything brown or good for them you can pass it off as white. It is made from a strain of hard white winter wheat berries (I remember reading somewhere that it is a naturally occurring albino strain?) and the nutritious bran and germ aren't processed out the way they are in all-purpose white flour. The white whole wheat flour makes for a tender crumb, and these pancakes are the perfect way to try something other than the old all-purpose flour.

The whole blueberry maple syrup is perfectly delicious and great when fresh blueberries come into season. I imagine it would also be delicious on ice cream, as a tart filling...I suspect there are some cheesecake lovers out there, perfect for that too. Let me know what you think.

This recipe was originally posted in late summer - as I'm reposting it from the archives it is now December and I'm imagining these pancakese would be delicious with cranberries swapped in for the blueberries in the original recipe. Or just get rid of the blueberry maple syrup all together and top with some of the ruby red cranberry jam from last week. Yum.

 
 
 
 

Whole-Grain Pancake Recipe with Blueberry Maple Syrup

If you can't find white whole wheat flour, feel free to substitute unbleached all-purpose flour.

1 (6-ounce) basket blueberries, rinsed
1/4 cup natural granulated sugar (evaporated cane sugar)
1/4 cup real-deal, PURE, maple syrup
2 tablespoons water

2 cups white whole wheat flour (or unbleaced all-purpose flour)
1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/3 cup natural granulated sugar (evaporated cane sugar)
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
2 1/4 cups organic buttermilk
2 large organic eggs, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons butter, melted (melt in the pan skillet you are going to use)

butter, to serve (and for pan)

To make the blueberry maple syrup put 1/2 of the blueberries, the sugar, maple syrup, and water in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Heat and stir until the sugar dissolves and simmer for 5 or 6 minutes or until the blueberries begin to split. Remove from heat and press the blueberry mixture through a fine strainer into a bowl. Mash the fruit to get all the juiciness extracted. Throw out the solids. Stir the remaining blueberries into the warm syrup and set aside.

To make the pancakes combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add the buttermilk, eggs, and melted butter. Stir all the ingredients until they are just combined. Don't worry if the batter is a bit lumpy, you don't want to over mix.

Heat your skillet, pan, or griddle to medium-hot and brush it with a bit of butter. Test for the right temperature. If a drop of water dropped onto the pan starts to dance, you are in the ballpark. Pour about 1/3 of a cup of batter into the skillet. Wait until the pancake bottom is deep golden in color, then flip with a spatula and cook the other side until golden and cooked through. Repeat with the remaining batter.

Serve with a golden pat of butter and plenty of blueberries and syrup.

Makes about 12 large pancakes, or dozens of silver-dollars - enough to feed a small crowd.

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Your Comments


Rachel
August 3, 2006

The pancakes sound yummy! I will have to track down a bag of that flour.

 

Lexi
August 3, 2006

The pancakes and syrup do sound delicious but your are mistaken to call the pancakes "whole-grain" when they are actually only "whole-wheat" Using whole wheat flour, be it white or regular is not the same as using whole grain which would be the actual wheat berry and not the ground berry which is what flour is.

 

joyce
August 3, 2006

Whole, Schmole - wheat is a grain...King Arthur white whole wheat is fabulous for replacing AP in most baked goods...and you're right on the money. Those unsuspecting white flour eaters gobble it up!
Nice job, Heidi...I just hate seeing those shmushed berries thrown away...why not leave the cooked berries in the syrup...get all the nutritional benefit!

 

matt
August 3, 2006

Well now I know what I will be making Sunday morning!

Thanks so much for the info Heidi, I honestly had no idea how flavored fruit syrups were made, I thought the only option were the cloyingly sweet fake choices.

I was wrong!

 

Lena
August 3, 2006

I found King Arthur white whole wheat flour at a store chain called Trader Joes.

 

Jackie
August 4, 2006

These sound delicious! I live in the UK and have not seen white whole wheat flour in any of my usual foodie shops. Would regular whole wheat flour be suitable? Or would it be better to mix half AP/half whole wheat?

 

shaakirah
August 4, 2006

sounds great i think the kids will love it!

 

julia
August 4, 2006

O wow, these look indeed very fluffy and tasty!
I haven’t got actually good experiences with pancakes (or the Dutch ones – those are bigger and thinner, called pannekoeken...)
They always burn, stay to white or I break them while flipping...
But these look pretty simple, (and so yummy) I will give them (another) try! tnx :)

 

Garrett
August 4, 2006

Mmm, pancakes. Sounds like the perfect summer pancake. My partner was complaining that I only make pumpkin pecan pancakes and he wanted something a bit lighter for the summer. I think you just solved out little dilemma!

 

Christina
August 4, 2006

I'm thrilled to have found this recipe! (And your blog, to be perfectly frank.) I can't eat white flour -- something about how they process it makes me sick. Can you tell me where you find that new whole wheat flour that looks white?

I can't wait to be able to make some of my 'regular' recipes again. And this one sounds incredible!

Take care,
Christina

 

flo
August 4, 2006

Very very tempting recipe. Will have to try this!

 

Heidi
August 4, 2006

Joyce, I smashed the berries through the strainer to push some of that blueberry flavor out of the berry and into the maple syrup base. Texture was also a consideration, I was thinking about stirring it back in but it looked quite gritty. My gritty might be someone else’s rustic though ;)

For those of you looking for white whole wheat flour, King Arthur is a good brand that is widely available. If I wasn’t able to find the white whole wheat, I would substitute whole wheat pastry flour, also lends a nice tender crumb without the heaviness of whole wheat flour.

 

Stephane
August 4, 2006

I love everything that's wholegrain ;-) I try to use whole wheat everytime it's possible (delicious, but maybe when you make "petits sablés" you'll prefer to keep the light brown (actually the best colour would be light yellow or even white! So I prefer to add crushed cereal flakes).

 

Val Barker
August 4, 2006

It is very misleading to name these pancakes "Whole-Grain Pancakes with . . ." when you are only using white flour. Whole grain indicates to many of us that you are using whole wheat flour ground directly from whole grain wheat. White flour is what you have left over after all of the vitamins, minerals, and husk of the wheat berry have been removed! Essentially, white flour is a starch, and makes good glue in a pinch. There is no such thing as "natural granulated sugar". There is nothing natural about it. Please do more research before you once again enter this arena. Thanks.

 

Heidi
August 4, 2006

The white whole wheat flour is ground from whole grain wheat. When I say natural granulated sugar (evaporated cane sugar) I am trying to call out an ingredient that is sometimes hard to identify. There is a spectrum of processing that happens with sugar that runs from dehydrated cane juice to the highly refined white sugar you see all the time. I'm just trying to encourage people to explore some of the less processed granulated sweeteners out there. The labels when it comes to sweeteners can be confusing. There are food writers who I respect that call-out minimally refined sugar as natural sugar/evaporated can sugar - but I'm open to other suggestions if you have them.

 

Hollie
August 4, 2006

Forget the white whole wheat flour, that I've got a ton of - where have the blueberries gone? I can't find them! Is there a blueberry shortage?

 

Tiny Banquet Committee
August 4, 2006

This recipe sounds amazingly delicious and I will be taking it to Maine with me later this month in case I should encounter local blueberries while I'm there! Also, thank you Heidi for specifying a basket of blueberries in the ingredients and giving the approximate weight - I never know how many berries to buy when I have a specific recipe in mind because most recipes call for them by cup.

 

Susan G
August 4, 2006

Don't get sticky with the words, please! "Whole" means "entire," nothing removed; it can be cracked, flaked or ground as well as in the "berry." And Heidi explaned the "white" part in the third paragraph up top -- actually I would say it's a paler shade of tan. Anyway, I think the crux of the recipe is the buttermilk -- acid + leavening = fluffy. I read this right after a delicious dinner and wanted to race back to the kitchen and whip up a batch!

 

Lisa
August 4, 2006

My son is allergic to eggs. Do you think the pancakes will taste as good without the eggs?

 

Nicole
August 5, 2006

What a coincidence! I just got through eating some whole wheat sour cream blueberry pancakes :-) I tried out King Arthur's whole wheat pastry flour although I usually just use the traditional whole wheat. I have some blueberries left over so I would love to try these recipes tomorrow! Can't get enough pancakes ;-)

 

Amy
August 5, 2006

In response to Lexi's comment, if the flour is ground from the whole berry, it is indeed considered whole grain. Most white flour has the bran and husk removed before grinding.

These do sound delicious, I just got home from Maine with some blueberries, I am going to cook now!

 

Tiffany
August 5, 2006

They sound a little grainy but I think that they will work out just fine.

 

darla
August 6, 2006

These were wonderful!!! Didn't try the blueberry sauce yet, but the pancakes were a definate hit. Thanks

 

maryeats
August 6, 2006

These pancakes look so beautiful. The pinnacle of summer breakfasts!

 

Julie
August 7, 2006

Whole grain pancakes are a favorite of mine. I'll often use the Arrowhead Mills pancake mix, but this recipe is so easy. I like your use of buttermilk. Thanks!

 

Jade
August 7, 2006

I have the same question - what can you substitute instead of the egg? And any thoughts on how to make this vegan? Is that possible?

 

Lauren
August 8, 2006

To veganize these you could use Ener-G egg replacer (mixed with water), or ground flax (also mixed with water) in place of eggs. The flax lends a distinctive flavor, but is very nutritious.

To make vegan buttermilk, mix one tablespoon vinegar per 1 scant cup of soymilk. Let curdle for a minute before using.

And of course, a good vegan margarine (like Earth Balance) subs for the butter.

The recipe looks delicious, btw. :)

 

Estelle
August 8, 2006

Wow, I cannot think of any better pancakes than the buttermilk ones from your 1st cookbook! Those are my absolute favorite but you are tempting me to give these ones a try...

I like that you encourage us to try different kinds of sugar. I like the good old white one but there are so many delicious ones out there woth trying. My personal favorite are Muscovado and Rapadura, bothe of which are unprocessed and absolutely delicous.

 

Julianna
August 8, 2006

I am wondering if it would be possible to substitute soy milk for the buttermilk in this recipe? My boyfriend can't eat dairy products.

Thanks!

Julianna

 

Julie
August 8, 2006

I'm wondering the same thing as Julianna - do you think it would turn out okay with soy or almond milk? I'm always hesitant to make pancakes because of not knowing... and I can't do dairy either!

 

stef
August 8, 2006

have you tried Wheat Montana? it's the very best "white" whole wheat. -- see wheat montana's website at wheatmontana.com

and some recipes here: http://www.stefoodie.net/index.php?s=wheat+montana
-- including one where i substitute ricemilk for buttermilk. these were written before we found out about family members' food allergies:(. we used to bake bread using wheat montana flour once a week, four loaves at a time.... it really makes a fabulous bread!!!

 

Dee
August 8, 2006

Can you clabber the soy milk with a little lemon juice? Never tried it, so I don't know if it would work.

I just made whole wheat buttermilk pancakes with rolled oats and blueberries - fluffy and delish! It was a dinner meal and I was looking for something a little heartier for three big guys who complain that pancakes for supper don't stick with them long enough. No complaints tonight. :)

Didn't see this recipe until just now. It sounds great, especially the blueberry syrup. Oh my.

 

daniel
August 9, 2006

Blueberries AND pancakes--now there's a combination that can't go wrong! i also have a recipe for Wild Blueberry Sauce that's AwEsOmE with ricotta pancakes! for something new and different--try some Canadian maple syrup for a change--beats Aunt Jamima "hands-down!"

daniel [from: where else?']
Canada [eh :-)]

 

Valerie
August 13, 2006

I made the pancakes this morning and they were great. Instead of making the blueberry syrup, I just added blueberries to the batter. A bit of maple syrup on top and it was delicious!

 

Mara
August 14, 2006

As for the people asking about egg substitutes, I like to add a little apple sauce. I usually just estimate about the same volume as an egg, and it works pretty well. Makes for very delicious cornbread! The flax/water mixture is also pretty yummy, though I know a few people who don't like the flavor it adds. I can't stand that powdered egg replacer, it makes all my recipes taste like bitter chalk.

 

Iris
September 16, 2006

Oh. My. Goodness. I'm sitting with a plate of these to my right and I can honestly say these are The Best Pancakes I have ever eaten. I had no blueberries, so I made the syrup using strawberries instead and, gosh, so good. Fantastic. Make these pancakes.

 

Christine
September 22, 2006

I love blueberries in my pancakes but I've never had any that looked remotely as delicious as yours do! and I love that picture of the berries on the wooden table. :)

 

Deborah Dowd
December 26, 2007

Heidi, these look so light and delicious. Perfect for my houseful for the holidays!

 

Cassie
December 26, 2007

I just made a really similar recipe to this! Yours looks so delicious, though. Your recent archives are loaded with stuff so similar to what I've been cooking the last few weeks! Are we sharing a brain and I don't know it? Heh. I made my brussel sprouts by stewing them in apple cider, though! (French thing?) You should try it, I'd be curious to compare notes with somebody about it. :)

 

Skrockodile (Sabra)
December 26, 2007

I know it might be slightly high maintenance but have you ever tried grinding your own whole wheat or buckwheat for pancakes? I've heard it really makes them outsanding and am curious to try.

 

Rachael
December 26, 2007

This is close to a pancake recipe I use all of the time, though I would really encourage you to try adding bran to your waffles or pancakes next time. I substitute up to half of my flour with bran (sometimes have to reduce the liquid a bit or add in something thicker, like yogurt, because the bran doesn't absorb milk)... it lends a wonderfully nutty flavor to things and it lightens the texture substantially, not to mentioned the good-for-you fiber. I find bran waffles and pancakes to stay nice and crispy

Will definitely have to try the blueberry maple syrup!

 

Michael
December 26, 2007

Perfect for my new skillet! Hey, I've been anxious to try the "Autumn Millet Bake," but don't have any millet. I was wondering if anyone has made this with bulgar, wild rice, or spelt? I love butternut squash, and I was actually thinking of using the heirloom red-curry squash I recently found at the local orchard.

 

JEP
December 26, 2007

Delicious sounding recipe...would love this for supper tonite!

 

Holly
December 27, 2007

We picked blueberries at this amazing organic farm in northern Mass. last summer and froze them. We've been rationing them into our pancakes ever since. Can't wait to try this syrup and pancake recipe!

 

YOYO Cookint
December 27, 2007

yummy~

love pancake too~

 

Mansi
December 28, 2007

I like the idea of using white whole wheat flour heidi..a pancake looks muhc more appealing when its white and fluffy:) but does this flour really have any of the goodness of "actual" whole wheat flour???

 

JenS
December 28, 2007

Exellent dish! So similar to one I love to make. I don't use butternilk that often and too find that it's great for pancakes.
I got your cookbook for Christmas and now can't wait to start some dishes.

h

 

morgan
February 17, 2008

i havn't been able to find WHITE whole wheat flour...but i did find whole wheat flour..it was a bit big(per "granual")..so i food processed it...and wal-la! perfect texture..and delicious...and healthy =)

 

Jen S
February 27, 2008

I've seen this one before on your site and always come back to it. Yours is so close to my favorite pancake. I've substituted milk when buttermilk isn't around or even done half of the liquid subbed with cottage cheese!

 

Jenny
March 1, 2008

I just made these this morning for my lactose-intolerant twins, substituting the 2 1/4 C buttermilk for 1C soy milk. They were absolutely awesome! I ground 2 C wheat berries, which made 4C flour, and doubled the recipe for my large family. As a new favorite, this is destined to be a repeat weekend recipe for years to come! Thank you, Heidi!!!!!!!