Seeded Flatbread

Seeded Flatbread Recipe


We are in the middle of a cold snap here in San Francisco. A mild one, as far as cold snaps are concerned, but reason enough to reaffirm my friendship with my oven. It has been working overtime - granola, batches of cookies, gratins, and yesterday this seeded flatbread. The flatbread is made from white whole wheat flour along with pepitas, sunflower, poppy, and mustard seeds. You can pull the dough out paper thin or leave it a bit thicker, serve it straight or bake it with toppings. Whatever you like, really.

Seeded Flatbread Recipe

I actually stumbled on some flatbread notes while tidying up my desk. I tried to do a version a while back using whole, uncooked millet and quinoa. The notes in the margin cautioned me to use less crunchy ingredients the next time around, ones less likely to crack a tooth ;). This time I went the seed route, and my one mistake was not crushing the mustard seeds before adding them to the rest of the ingredients - but I've adjusted the recipe to take this into account.

Seeded Flatbread Recipe

When I pull the flatbread dough extra thin, I sometimes add a thin later of toppings. The version in the photo below was baked with paper thin slices of sauteed potatoes, a bit of cheese, a pinch of fresh thyme. When I leave the flatbread a bit thicker, like you see in the first photo, I usually skip the toppings, preferring it right out of the oven with a bit of salted butter - and preferably alongside a big bowl of soup.

Seeded Flatbread Recipe

And just a reminder, you need to make the dough the night before, it takes about 10-15 minutes to prepare the dough, and then you pull it out and bake it the next day.

 
 
 
 

Seeded Flatbread Recipe

This recipe makes a hearty, dense flatbread. If you tend to like your breads slightly lighter, I'd recommend starting with 1/2 unbleached all-purposed flour & 1/2 white whole wheat flour to see how you like it. You can play with the ratio in future batches based on that. If you have trouble finding white whole wheat flour, using all unbleached all-purpose flour will work. I have a note to myself to try a spelt flour version as well, and to add some wheat or oat germ that has been pulsed into a flour in a food processor. For those of you who are curious, I have been using King Arthur brand White Whole Wheat Flour. And once last thing, if your whole grain flour starts to smell soapy and generally off, it has probably gone rancid, and needs to be replaced.

4 1/2 cups / 1 lb. 6.5 oz / 640 g White Whole Wheat Flour


1 3/4 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon instant yeast / active dry yeast

1 cup / 5 oz / 140g seeds (I use equal parts chopped pepitas, sunflower & poppy seeds)

1 1/2 tablespoons mustard seeds, toasted and crushed

1/4 cup / 60ml extra-virgin olive oil

2 cups / 475 ml water, ice cold
semolina flour or cornmeal for dusting baking sheet

Stir together the flour, salt, yeast, and seeds in the bowl of an electric mixer. By hand stir in the oil and the cold water until the flour is absorbed. Switch to the dough hook and mix on medium speed for 7 minutes or so, or as long as it takes to create a smooth, sticky dough. As you are mixing, the dough should clear the sides of the bowl but stick to the bottom of the bowl (to me it looks a bit like a tornado). Add a touch of water or flour to reach the desired effect. The finished dough will be springy, elastic, and sticky, not just tacky.

Transfer the dough to a floured counter top. Cut it into 6 equal pieces and mold each into a ball. Rub each ball with olive oil and slip into plastic sandwich bags. Refrigerator overnight.



When you are ready to make flatbread (anytime in the next few days), remove the desired number of dough balls from the refrigerator at least 1 hour before making the bread. Keep them in a warm place, covered, so they don't dry out. 



At the same time place a baking stone on a rack in the lower third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. If you don't have a baking stone, you can use a sheet pan, but do not preheat the pan.

 Generously dust a peel or a sheet pan with a bit of semolina flour or cornmeal and get ready to shape your dough. Uncover or unwrap the dough balls and dust them with flour. Working one at a time, gently press a dough round into a disk wide enough that you can bring it up onto your knuckles to thin it out. You can pull it as much or as little as you like. The dough in the lead image was pulled about 6-7-inches, and the one further down the page was pulled paper thin. If the dough is being fussy and keeps springing back, let it rest for another 15-20 minutes. Place the pulled-out dough on the prepared pan, and jerk the pan to make sure the dough will move around on the cornmeal ball-bearings (you don't want it to stick to the pan).

Add your toppings if you are using toppings (less is more!) and slide the topped pizza onto the baking stone. Bake until the crust is crisp and nicely colored - I start checking on it after 7 minutes or so, but it can take quite a bit longer depending on how thick or not thick you've pulled it. Remove from the oven.



Makes six 6-ounce flatbreads.


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Your Comments


Koek!
December 9, 2009

Oh. Yum.

 

Flo Makanai
December 9, 2009

Mmmm! I'm going to bake those with approx 1 cup sourdough instead of the yeast. I love the huge amount of seeds you put in that bread.
With a more neutral oil, that would certainly be super nice as a crust for an apple galette (+ a little raw sugar spinkled on top)
Thanks!!

 

christie @ honoring health
December 10, 2009

Sounds delicious, before I had to stop eating gluten, I used to love seedy breads. I especially love poppyseed bread. Hey, that gives me an idea. I need to make a poppy seed loaf!

 

Estela @ Weekly Bite
December 10, 2009

Thanks so much for this recipe! I've been on a bread making kick lately! I have yet to try my hand at flat bread! I love flat bread pizza... maybe this weekend :)

 

I love seedy, textured breads. Mostly, to be honest, I love how the little nubby bits grab whatever I am spreading on top of the bread :)
A foot of snow fell in southern Vermont yesterday. It's magical here, and I am warm with my wood stove - but I think there is something comforting and homey about a hot oven, and a kitchen fragrant with fresh baked bread.
Inspired! Michaela

 

Simply Life
December 10, 2009

oh my this looks amazing! I hope to be able to make it soon!

 

nancy at goodfoodmatters
December 10, 2009

I think we're feeling the cold snap across the whole country!
VERY Cold in Nashville TN this morning...
Thanks for this recipe---it looks beautiful, well-tested, and enormously doable!

 

Margy
December 10, 2009

Speaking of cracking a tooth, I almost broke one on my computer screen trying to take a bite of that bread! It looks delicious.

 

How about uncooked or toasted amaranth instead of quinoa or millet?

 

Heather @ chiknpastry
December 10, 2009

I'm on a bread-baking kick, so I might just whip this up. I'm sure the extras will freeze just fine before baking, don't ya think?

 

fresh365
December 10, 2009

Just perfect! This is going to the top of my to-do list. I have been craving a potato-pizza of sorts and this will more than fit the bill!

 

Mouse
December 10, 2009

Homemade bread is the loveliest answer to icy winter weather. Coming in from the cold to the smell of baking bread makes me happy!

 

VIDYA
December 10, 2009

Heidi,
I am Indian and use black mustard seeds in almost all my dishes. the key to using the mustard seeds is toasting them in a little bit of hot oil and wait till they crackle.

 

kyle
December 10, 2009

OH MY GOD! heidi!!! how do you do it??? this look s so incredibly delicious. you are so inspiring....

 

isabel
December 10, 2009

Oh! I have never thought of putting mustard seeds into my doughs. What a lovely idea--perhaps some fennel, too.

 

SallyBR
December 10, 2009

I am also intrigued by the mustard seeds - something to consider on my next flatbread. I make this kind of bread quite often, and have used spelt flour together with regular, white flour.

I really like the flavor, but usually don't put more than 1/4 of the full amount.

thanks for the recipe... it is already saved!

 

Nutmeg Nanny
December 10, 2009

I wish the weather we were experiencing right now was just a snap. Oh well I can't really complain I do live in NY. This bread not only look beautiful but sounds really delicious and healthy. I love all the grains and nut...yum!

 

Freya
December 10, 2009

Looks incredible! I love seeds. Do you think onions could be incorporated in any way? Almost like a stuffing so they stay moist? I think I'm channeling some sort of onion bread/bialy that I've had before.

 

OperaJoys
December 10, 2009

The pictures are marvelous. I'd love to reach right in an sample the buttered one!

I've had a variety of multi-seeded breads, and often the variety confuses the flavors. Care should be taken to pick the right companions flavorwise, not just look-wise.

 

Julie
December 10, 2009

Looks wonderful...and I have everything but the sunflower seeds on hand! I think this has my name on it this weekend!

 

Pamela
December 10, 2009

There is something very attracting in the word Seeded....
I am fortunate to have bought a wheat mill in the 70's, and enjoy making my own fresh whole wheat flour. I tried your Ginger cookies with spelt and ww flour and the fresh ginger flecks with shaved chocolate. They were wonderful! I refer everyone I meet to your site!
I can hear your notes on whole seeds (like millet) breaking teeth. I have an Italian friend who makes fantastic bread in one of those long.... angel food pans. I loved his bread in which he throws in so many grains and brans and wheat germ etc., but had to be honest about his whole millet. EEK! Try $3000 worth of bridges if a cracked tooth can't be saved...
Just a note on other seeds: Sunflower seeds or whole flax seeds (which can't be digested, and are often found for 'health' in cookies and breads) can get caught in the intestinal folds and cause days of gas and misery for those with diverticulitis, etc. or leanings towards it, like colitis. So, poppy seeds can still delight, whereas swallowing an unchewed sunflower seed can be a distant reminder of a great recipe..for a few unhappy days, for some. Obviously, each to his own. I have a great recipe for onion cheese bread with poppyseeds on top that I'll put on my blog...

 

BethT @ Pretty By The Bay
December 10, 2009

I live in SF, as well. As a former midwesterner, I forget what "real" cold feels like....this 45-50 degree weather feels like a blizzard to me! :) Delicious looking recipe.

 

Maninas
December 10, 2009

Sounds fantastic! I love the first photo in particular. I really like the idea of adding the seeds to the flatbread. I must try that soon.

 

Maninas
December 10, 2009

I forgot to ask: is it really important to leave the dough overnight, or can I just leave it stand for just a few hours? Thanks!

 

stephanie
December 10, 2009

isabel,

anise (fennel flavor) seeds are classic morrocan... used in flatbreads there pretty regularly. yummy, but usually at a low enough level to be relatively innocuous.

Also can't wait to finish up the semester and start the holiday baking. this definitely makes the to do list, but with sesame instead of poppy seeds.

 

emma. our ktichen
December 10, 2009

This bread looks delicious, I will have to give it a go over the weekend. Beautiful photos!

 

Donna
December 10, 2009

I am in the Bay Area also and decided to start my stollen baking binge this week to keep the kitchen toasty! So tonight, after the next batch, it will be no problem to mix up a batch of the flatbread to eat tomorrow with Anna Thomas's Green Ginger Soup.

(On a side note, I am pretty methodical about culling my cookbooks from time to time, but one book that continues to escape the culling is Vegetarian Epicure. I have had it for probably 35 years and it is raggedy and tattered, but I still turn to it for many old faves! So - I am looking forward to trying this soup!)

Heidi, thanks to you for the many recipes you've contributed to my repertoire in the past 2 years or so. Everything I've made receives high honors from family and guests!

 

Tony
December 10, 2009

Mmmmmmmm! I love making flatbread; usually it's a pita bread for when I want bread in a few hours instead of in a few days. But, this looks delicious and worth waiting for overnight.

 

It has been cold in San Francisco, but then again it's freezing everywhere else across the nation. The drop in temperature has been sudden and steep. I like that your recipe calls for toasting the mustard seeds and then crushing. I often forget how much flavor is coaxed out of the toasting step.

 

Katie
December 10, 2009

Heidi, do you think these would make good bread sticks? I'm having a cocktail party next weekend, and was hoping for something like this...and thought maybe I could pull the dough, then cut/roll into strips/logs and bake...what do you think?

 

Monica
December 10, 2009

Mark Bittman also mentions instant yeast but I cannot find it anywhere. I can find active dry yeast but I don't believe this is the same thing. I have checked at several grocery stores and Whole Foods. Can anyone explain? Is there anything else it could be called? Where can I find it!?!? Thanks in advance :)

 

Robin
December 10, 2009

what is white whole wheat flour?

 

Coconut Recipes
December 10, 2009

Looks delicious!

 

jen
December 10, 2009

sounds delicious!

can someone tell me where (in the bay area) to find mustard seeds?

 

kamran siddiqi
December 10, 2009

This looks absolutely delicious. It reminds me of Naan because of its versatility and how you can top (and or fill) naan with just about anything imaginable. Lovely post, Heidi! :)

 

Amy
December 10, 2009

Such a gorgeous recipe! Could I put some of the balls of dough in the freezer after they've rested over night so I always have some at the ready? If so, could I dethaw them in the refrigerator overnight and then let them sit out for an hour before baking?

Thanks so much!

 

Amy
December 10, 2009

Robin: white whole wheat flour is an unbleached flour made from white rather than red wheat; it retains more of its nutrition than AP flour without producing the grainy, dense texture pure whole wheat flour often gives to baked goods.

 

Karen@Cook4Seasons
December 10, 2009

This flatbread jumped off the page, probably because I, too, am freezing in Napa and have a serious carb craving going on. Seeds are my favorite additions - I think I'll try flax, too!

 

Matthew F
December 10, 2009

Heidi,
Been getting very seriously into baking lately (I've got a sourdough starter living in the fridge and everything!) and in looking at some recipes online from the bread freaks who take the matter VERY seriously, I just wanted to let you know I'm glad to see you providing gram measurements for this bread recipe!
For the uninitiated, baking by weight is really the only way to do it! If you use volume, you could get a different amount of ingredient each time you measure! Digital kitchen scale = 100% accuracy!

 

epb
December 10, 2009

So would whole wheat pastry flour work?

 

Judy
December 10, 2009

My SF oven has been perpetually on this week, too! (And the recipes have ALL been 101 Cookbooks.) Adding this to tomorrow afternoon's activity list!

 

Nataie Sztern
December 10, 2009

You just gave me a fabulous idea for leftover pizza dough that I have frozen...I'm gonna make flatbread.

 

Effie Tennyson
December 10, 2009

Do you have a recipe for treacle bread? I have childhood memories of autumn evenings and farm work, my grandmother in a wrap around apron and the wonderful aroma of this magical treacle bread.

 

Russell
December 10, 2009

What would this be like with other flours (e.g., buckwheat)?

 

Claire
December 10, 2009

I'm getting a stand mixer for Christmas and the first thing I want to make with it is bread, so I appreciate the clear instructions for using a mixer. Also, my family loves seed bread but I've never thought to use pepitas, so thanks for that idea!

 

Kevin Lynch
December 10, 2009

This recipe sounds amazing. The textural component of the seeds is inviting. I'll have this dough in the fridge by tonight. Thanks for the recipe.
Kevin Lynch

 

Faith
December 10, 2009

Any tips for making this by hand (for someone without a cuisinart)?

 

Challa
December 10, 2009

Yeah, what is white whole wheat flour?

 

LindaCO
December 10, 2009

You have the most beautiful photography. It makes already delicious recipes that much more appealing.

 

Sarah
December 10, 2009

This bread looks delicious, and I will give it a go this weekend.

Speaking of cold spells, we got 15 inches in Madison, WI yesterday, and temperatures have been below zero. Makes you feel a little toastier, huh? : )

 

Brian
December 11, 2009

Heidi, your amazing ! I made the Chocolate Oblivion Truffle Torte...OMG!!! I then made the recipe into single miniature "muffins" for gifts because it truly is the most amazing chocolate "cake". I lightly buttered the teflon pans, put the base of the very hot water bath in the oven for 20 minutes, added filled two miniature muffin pans and then baked at 425 for 5 minutes, pulled them and covered lightly with a piece of foil. After they cooled, wrapped pans and chilled. They came out great, but I must say give them 3 days to give, or mail right away...that third day they had developed all the flavors and were as pure a culinary gift as I have ever done, and I am a retired chef, 37 years creating. "As close to heaven as I may get on earth"......TY Heidi

 

Tuula
December 11, 2009

Greetings from London! Heidi this looks delicious - am chucking it my husband's way, he's the breadmaker in the family ...we made your bbq pizzas a few weeks ago and they were so much fun and so delicious - Thank you!

 

Naimah
December 11, 2009

sounds yummy, i can't say i've ever cooked with mustard seeds. it sounds yummy!

Naimah
CoolBlackChef.co.uk

 

Anna (londonfoodieny)
December 11, 2009

Yum- they look so good! Why do you have to make the dough the night before?! I want to make these now!

 

Laura
December 11, 2009

From a bread-baking newbie without a stand mixer, would it be OK if I made this bread and mixed the ingredients by hand after kneading? Thank you, Bread Mavens.

 

tobias cooks!
December 11, 2009

Love your seeded bread. looks delicious.

 

I wish I was a taste tester for your recipes. Can't wait to make - love the seeds.

 

Cathy
December 11, 2009

To answer the several questions that came up about this, white whole wheat flour is made from white whole wheat (instead of red). It looks white and is a bit lighter than regular whole wheat flour - but it has all the nutrition.

You can get it in some grocery stores, and from the King Arthur site.

I always wonder why people don't google these questions!

 

That whole store in the fridge overnight is always gets me. I get so impatient and just want to bake straight away.

 

Delicious Meal&Recipe
December 11, 2009

very cool & delicious dish, thank you very much for sharing.

Can I share this recipe on my recipe library?


Awaiting your response. Thank

 

Linda
December 11, 2009

Tried to post this at the post for Big Sur Hide Bread...Well, at the risk of of sounding pesky...I visited the Big Sur Bakery on my road trip to San Diego with my daughter. Hmmm. what can I say....it was closed for the season....random creepy hoddie dude hanging about grunted at us as we walked up to the entrance..he went inside and shut door..oh yeah he neglected to tell us (can he speak?) ... they are closed for a break..thank you grunting hoodie guy for telling us before we walked up the lane to entrance...very strange and almost unsettling site..almost Twin Peakish...Very isolated and if staff want business may I humbly suggest PR person shape up locals so that they are conversant and able to speak instead of grunting and bobbing their heads at potential customers...but I digress.....maybe I am just a big city type who does not get the charm of
isolationist chic.

 

Barbara@rootsandseeds.com
December 12, 2009

My friend Kirsten made this last night and they are delicious!! She paired it with a great broccoli soup and a crunchy cabbage salad...yum!! The flat breads were amazing though~ highly recommend this recipe~

 

Sarah
December 12, 2009

Someone asked about making this bread by hand. I don't have a mixer and I made this bread by hand. It turned out exactly as Heidi described. As I was adding the water I was mixing with a wooden spoon. The bread cleaned the side of the bowl and came together nicely. Then I kneaded it by hand for a few minutes. My bread is still in the fridge so I have yet to see how it tastes. But, so far, making it by hand was easy and turned out exactly as the recipe stated it would.

 

Rennie
December 12, 2009

This looks delicious! I can't wait to try it!

 

Heidi
December 12, 2009

Any tips for someone who doesn't have an electric mixer? I want to try my hand at making simple breads, but it seems like almost every recipe I find only gives instructions using a mixer!

 

Christina, Denmark
December 12, 2009

Looks very interesting, will give it a try! Thankyou very much for converting into grams ;-) Love this blog and the nice pics!

 

Sweets at Vicky's
December 12, 2009

It's a sleepy Sunday morning here in Singapore and I think I may just have the perfect inspiration for brunch. :) Thanks!

 

The Purple Foodie
December 13, 2009

Very different from the breads I've tried - seeds inside and not just out is lovely!

 

Emily
December 13, 2009

Hi Heidi
I just wanted to say how much I love your site!! My mum and I have been making your recipes together for the last couple of months and we have loved every one :)
One question regarding this recipe though....is it possible to make these using a breadmaker? And if so would we have to refigerate it overnight or could we just leave it to rise in the breadmaker for a couple of hours?
Thanks and keep up the great work. xx

 

This reminds me of this amazing flatbread I buy at my local health food store. Must make!

 

jennyccy
December 13, 2009

Every time I make my own bread, it is as hard as a rock. Do you have any idea how to make it soft?

 

Ultrasound Mary
December 13, 2009

Made this tonight to go with some beans--it was wonderful!! Very chewy and the seeds add lots of flavor. I still have 3 more to bake later this week. Another great recipe.

 

S.
December 14, 2009

Oooh, I love the butter melting on top. Warm fresh bread and butter is amazing.

 

The Leftoverist
December 14, 2009

We've had a REAL cold snap up in Seattle :) and this would make the 16 degree nights much more bearable.

 

Linda
December 14, 2009

Could rice flour be used here in place of wheat flour? We have the allergy problem to all eggs, legums and grain except rice.

 

Anonymous
December 14, 2009

Mmm, this is the sort of thing I could eat daily with a salad or cup of soup. Lovely photos and congrats on the O Magazine mention.

I was sitting with my mom at the counter and she was flipping through the magazine, saying "do you know this 101 cookbooks lady, honey? She lives in SF and does that food blogging thing you do?" Too funny. Well deserved--congrats!

HS: I need to go track it down! I still haven't seen it yet :)

 

cedar chest
December 14, 2009

I like breads that have this nutty texture. It is a favorite of mine! Thanks for the recipe! It is a darling. I love the color! I am going to think of seeds that I can add to those.

 

Lis
December 15, 2009

How much yeast would I use if I am using active dry yeast instead of instant? I see you say to use 1 tsp, but I've heard you're supposed to use more if not using instant. Thanks a bunch!

 

Patricia Ann
December 15, 2009

Seriously, nothing beats home made bread! I'm definitely going to give this a try. Although, I was wondering, I've made bread before using only whole wheat, but the dough ended up coming out really tough and as a result, hardly rose and was really thick and chewy. I ended up having to use a mixture of regular all purpose flour and the wheat. Since this recipe is calling for whole wheat, did your dough come out tough as I described or was it like working with just regular dough? If it wasn't tough at all, would you mind suggesting a couple types of brands?

Thanks!

 

katrina
December 17, 2009

Could this be made into crackers? I am imagining rolling the dough out thin and baking it twice; once at 450, and again at a lower temp to dry the flatbreads out. Would this work, or would you recommend another method? Thanks!

 

Tara
December 19, 2009

Love your recipes! This one reminds me of Cosi and I love their bread! Can't wait to try this!

 

Rachel
December 22, 2009

I love that this recipe is so versatile. A stand-alone, or endless possible toppings.

 

Carrie
December 22, 2009

this was my first attempt at any bread-like item involving yeast. i ended up topping it with carmelized onions and parmesan, and it was great. the nuttiness of the seeds really surprised me.

i agree with the other poster on any advice for kneading by hand in your baking recipes. do you have some sort of translation/conversion from your pre-kitchen aid days? i did my own sleuthing on the matter, but the dough didn't end up rising as much as i had hoped.

 

Hannah
December 23, 2009

This tastes so good with the "good soup for the sick" recipe!! Dipping it in the soup is amazing!

Thanks for the recipe!

 

Maria
December 25, 2009

I just made this today for Christmas dinner. Next time I use them as "bread" I will make smaller, more individual portions. However, this will be great when I make Indian food or maybe even piadinis.

 

Jessica
December 26, 2009

Hi Heidi

I made the dough on the 23rd thinking I would make a flatbread appetizer for our big celebration on Christmas Eve. Long story short, I'm just making some this morning with our poached eggs and it is so delicious. I soaked my seeds for a few hours before putting together the dough.

Thank you for all of your recipes - I use them frequently. I hope something brings you to Cleveland one day - we've got some great things going on here!