Toasted Pumpkin Seeds: Three Ways

Toasted Pumpkin Seeds: Three Ways Recipe


Toasting pumpkin seeds is fun and easy - and a great way to get creative with your spice drawer. I've wrangled up a beautiful collection of quirky pumpkins and winter squash over the past week - white "ghost" pumpkins, blue Hokkaido, carnival and ambercup squash. Yesterday a few of them went under the knife and we enjoyed the delicious byproduct - a bounty of seeds ripe for toasting. I wanted to try some different flavor combinations this year and ended up with a triptych of flavors: Sweet & Spicy Pumpkin Seeds, Black Tea & Butter Pumpkin Seeds, and Curried Pumpkin Seeds.

There are a couple of ways to go about toasting pumpkin seeds. I should mention, that in addition to the way I make them, there is also an extended cooking technique as well. If you have more time and patience, you can boil the seeds in salted water for roughly 10 minutes before draining and proceeding with the rest of the instructions (scale back on the salt called for in the individual recipes). Your seeds will have a nice crunch to them, and more balanced salt distribution. That being said, I usually skip this step (particularly if I'm at a pumpkin carving party and people are excited about sampling the seeds of their labor). If you're interested in this approach, be sure to check out Elise's Simply Recipes site if you want the play-by-play on this method.

There are a million ways to season your freshly toasted pumpkin seeds in addition to the ones I suggest below - raid your spice drawer, and use your imagination.

 
 
 
 

Sweet & Spicy Pumpkin Seeds

1 egg white
1/4 cup natural cane sugar
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grained sea salt
1 cup fresh pumpkin seeds

Preheat oven to 375. In a medium-sized bowl whisk together the egg white, sugar, cayenne and salt. Add the pumpkin seeds and toss well. Drain off any excess egg white (using a strainer) and place seeds in a single layer across a baking sheet. Bake for about 12 minutes or until seeds are golden. Sprinkle with a bit more sugar and cayenne pepper when they come out of the oven. Taste and season with more salt if needed.

Makes one cup.

Curried Pumpkin Seeds

1 egg white
2 teaspoon curry powder
scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grained sea salt
1 cup fresh pumpkin seeds

Preheat oven to 375.

In a medium-sized bowl whisk together the egg white, curry powder and salt. Add the pumpkin seeds and toss well. Drain off any excess egg white (using a strainer) and place seeds in a single layer across a baking sheet. Bake for about 12 minutes or until seeds are golden. Sprinkle with a bit more curry powder when they come out of the oven. Taste and season with more salt if needed.

Makes one cup.

Black Tea & Butter Pumpkin Seeds

You can use many different types of tea here. I opted for a smoky black one, but you can go for one infused with other flavors, or even tisanes (I have a dried lime tea that I be would be interesting in this recipe). Choose a tea that is fragrant and has a pronounced flavor for best results.

1 teaspoon (black) tea
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
scant 1/2 teaspoon fine grained sea salt
1 cup fresh pumpkin seeds

Preheat oven to 375.

Using a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, grind the tea into a fine powder. Set aside.

In a medium-sized bowl combine the butter and salt. Add the pumpkin seeds and toss well. Place seeds in a single layer across a baking sheet. Bake for about 12 minutes or until seeds are golden. Sprinkle with the ground tea. Taste and season with more salt if needed.

Makes one cup.

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Your Comments


rachel
October 28, 2006

How clever!

 

Garrett
October 28, 2006

LOL, wow what a coincidence. I am making some spicy garlic pumpkin seeds as we speak.
I have some left for a second batch, but I think I'll break out the blueberry tea or chai tea.

 

Tim
October 28, 2006

How creative. I had never given any thought to using the seeds direct from 'tonights' pumpkin. It is an idea I will store for my upcomming thanks giving dinner here in New Zealand.

 

Erlinda
October 28, 2006

Never thought about this possible ways of preparing pumpkin seeds. I'll try it and see the result. I have some visitors tomorrow.

 

courtney-clove
October 28, 2006

We at Naughty Curry are all over this one...

 

Abby
October 28, 2006

I remember the first time I had roasted pumpkin seeds - kindergarten! They seem to have really taken off in popularity since then, however, because my mom and I could never find a recipe for them (that worked) until now! Thanks!

 

Anna
October 28, 2006

Any advice for getting the pumpkin goop off the seeds?

 

grilledasparagus
October 28, 2006

I made some with ground up cumin, red pepper and sea salt...curry sounds delicious too. next year!

 

Pritya
October 28, 2006

Wow! That looks very interesting. Of course, melon seeds are a favourite of the family - excellent mouth freshener add-on, according to grandma. In fact, in childhood days, I have seen many sunny terraces with seeds drying on a plate. I love your pics.

 

deccanheffalump
October 28, 2006

Definitely worth a try ...Do you shell the seeds before or after roasting them?

 

Meredith
October 28, 2006

In cooking class this week, we were each given a pumpkin to carve. Part of the assignment was to roast the seeds. I flavored mine with cayenne, cumin, cinnamon, a good amount of salt and brown sugar. It's similar to your spicy-sweet one, Heidi, but with a Mexican kick. I though it was appropriate for Dia de los Muertos.

 

Kirsten
October 29, 2006

How thoughtful of you to include the note about RESCUEPRO. I couldn't bring myself to toss the corrupted cards; it will be a thrill to see the photos!

 

Stephanie Malcom
October 29, 2006

I baked mine then spreinkled cheese flavored salt and garlice on mine...YUMMMMMYYYYYY!

 

Susan G
October 29, 2006

A seedy story: in 1979 I was flying from London to DC. There was a crowd of people on the plane who were leaving Iran, shortly before the Shah left and the Ayatollah took over. They shared with us some of the snacks they were carrying -- seeds from various melons (not pumpkin)...
And another tea thought: we tried making a flavored oil with Lapsang Souchong leaves, but it was disappointingly bland; and has anyone tried green tea seed oil?

 

elizy
October 29, 2006

in response to getting the goop of the seeds. just wash them. it comes off.

 

Sarah
October 29, 2006

The easiest way to get the last little bits of goop off the seeds is to stick them in a big bowl and add water. The good sinks to the bottom while the seeds float, and you can just skim the clean seeds off the surface. Works every time! ;)

 

Mike
October 30, 2006

I tossed mine with Worchestershire sauce - then roasted them. Best part of Halloween in my opinion... ;-) (now where did my kids hide their candy stash?)

 

cyn
October 30, 2006

yum! my kids classes did the roasted with salt version yesterday. we have two pumpkins left. i'm going to try the black tea and butter recipe.

and thank you for the RESCUEPRO info, Heidi. this has not happened to us yet, but of course it will!

 

brian
October 30, 2006

i was gonna ask, when you say "smoky black tea" were you talking about lapsang souchong? that sounds great. i just made deborah madison's recipe for baked beans (using yellow soybeans -- weird!) and threw in some ground lapsang souchong and they were fantastic.

susan, that's odd about the flavored oil. it's a really strong tea so you'd think it'd work well. i've never tried making a tea-flavored oil; maybe tea leaves just don't steep well in fats? you could always try grinding the tea to a very fine powder and mixing it in the oil, but i guess it would eventually settle. hmm.

 

Heidi
October 30, 2006

Brian, exactly.

Susan, the tea oils I've come across recently are refined cooking oils (so they can claim high-smoke points)...so they lack flavor depth. I haven't tried to do a lapsang souchong oil-infusion...I guess the logical question is, how fat-soluble are different types of teas? hmm.

 

Mara
October 30, 2006

I tried something sort of like mixing your sweet and spicy with the curry. I melted butter with sugar in a pan, then added curry and the seeds. In the oven they went, and yummy curry-caramel coated seeds came out. Mmmm...

 

Luciano
October 30, 2006

Are we suposed to eat the seeds with the shells on? Here in Portugal we also use the pumpkin seeds as a snack, roasted with plain salt but unshelled.

 

Julia
October 31, 2006

this sounds (and looks!) as a perfect little nibble snack!
great! I love the flavour combo’s - very original
which one did you like the most??

 

Nicole
October 31, 2006

I think the sweet and spicy ones sound great! Happy Halloween!

 

Tana
October 31, 2006

What a timely post, Heidi. I visited a farm yesterday with EIGHTY kinds of squash and pumpkins. I'll pass your post along to them (and to my readers).

Good work as always! Thank you.

 

oldblackvw
October 31, 2006

Hi,
I haven't tried any of these but they look good. I am a huge pumkin seed fan and will try these recepies. What does the egg do for the seeds I just used Olive Oil and salt and baked for twenty minutes.
-K

 

threemilechild
October 31, 2006

Awh, someone beat me to the "dump it in a big bowl of water" suggestion for picking the seeds out of pumpkins. And squashes.

Also, having a Vincent Price movie on the tv helps.

We always boil our seeds -- I never knew you didn't have to, in fact -- in water so salty they need rinsing afterwards, and long enough that they become a little bit translucent. Perfect just with butter, though I'm now tempted to add a bit of smoked peppers and then dust them with garlic when they come out of the oven, in sort of a reverse pipian. (My family would complain: These aren't the pumpkin seeds we're expecting! And my aunt hates curry. Sigh.)

Also: I'd imagine the egg is just to get the spices to stick, in the absence of butter. Your olive oil probably does the same trick.

 

shaz
November 1, 2006

hi there! Great work on your blog. I added your blog as a link on mine. Hope you dun mind. shaz, a fellow foodie blogger.

 

Maddie
November 1, 2006

I've been roasting pumpkin seeds since I was a kid and LOVE them as a tasty snack in the fall. I didn't get around to buying or carving pumpkins this year but want some roasted seeds! Does anyone know where one can purchase 'fresh' raw pumpkin seeds themselves? I feel bad buying the pumpkins just for the seeds and then tossing out the rest (I don't bake pies).

Any idea if there is a way to get the same roasted effect with any sort of already roasted/baked seeds you can buy at the store? Thanks so much!

 

Stephanie
November 2, 2006

What a great idea... and they look so fabulous with their different colours too!

 

ana
November 3, 2006

I love roasted pumpkin seeds, cool blog, good info!

 

Lynne
November 4, 2006

Love your blog and am in the process of toasting the pumpkins seeds using the boiling water method first. A question-is there an easy way to get rid of all the fibers and strings from the seeds? I am also trying your recipe for the Thai Curry Pumpkin Soup using carnival squash.

 

Victoria Garner
November 6, 2006

I haven't tryed them yet; But I will!
~V

 

Victoria Garner
November 6, 2006

These are GREAT!!
A little salt, pepper, who needs them?
Not these pumpkin seeds!
~V :~) 714G

 

heather
November 7, 2006

A few people have asked the question here already but nobody's answered, so I'll ask again: Do you need to take the white outer shell off the pumpkin seed as you eat it, or do you eat the whole thing?

 

Heidi
November 7, 2006

I eat the whole thing. -h