Miso Soup Recipe

A simple, everyday approach to miso soup - it yields me a bowl of soup in five or ten minutes. You can keep it simple if you like, but in this version I add soba noodles and tofu, and a few garnishes.

Miso Soup

This is the miso soup recipe that nourished me back from illness. Remember when I was sick last month? Well, after a couple days of nothing but crackers and popsicles, it was miso soup that eventually brought me back to the land of functioning human beings. The first few pots were simply a couple tablespoons of light, mild white miso paste whisked into water with a pinch of salt - but I began to build from there. A handful of tiny tofu cubes went into the next pot, and noodles into the pot after that. Little by little I started to feel like myself again.

Miso Soup Recipe

This is a simple, everyday approach to miso soup - it yields me a bowl of soup in five or ten minutes. Sometimes I go simple, other times I start adding ingredients. Just keep in mind, you can take it in a thousand different directions depending on how you are feeling, what's in season at the markets, or the time of year. I tend to use lighter miso pastes in warmer months and the darker ones when I'm after a heartier, more substantial soup - sometimes I do a blend of two pastes. In place of the water you can certainly experiment with different broths, or even tea. And while this version incorporates noodles and tofu, you could certainly do all sorts of variations with sautéed vegetables. A tiny drizzle of toasted sesame oil is often a welcome addition, and mushrooms are a natural fit as well.

I would argue that this post is less a miso soup recipe, and more an encouragement to give it a go in your own kitchens. Let me know if you have any recommendations for your all-time favorite miso pastes - or if you blend, let me know your favorite blends as well. I'd be up for tracking down some new miso pastes - not just for soups, but for dressing and drizzles, and all that fun stuff as well.

MY NEWSLETTER + EBOOK
weeknight express

Sign up for my weekly-ish, ad-free newsletter, with recipes, inspirations, what I’m reading / watching / shopping.
(You’ll get a link for a free PDF e-book with 10 recipes)

weeknight express

Miso Soup Recipe

Miso Choice: This time around I used an organic white miso, but I'd encourage you to experiment with a range of misos.

3 ounces dried soba noodles
2 - 4 tablespoons miso paste (to taste)
2 - 3 ounces firm tofu (2 handfuls), chopped into 1/3-inch cubes
a handful of watercress or spinach, well washed and stems trimmed
2 green onions, tops removed thinly sliced
a small handful of cilantro
a pinch of red pepper flakes

Cook the soba noodles in salted water, drain, run cold water over the noodles to stop them from cooking, shake off any excess water and set aside.

In a medium sauce pan bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and remove from heat. Pour a bit of the hot water into a small bowl and whisk in the miso paste - so it thins out a bit (this step is to avoid clumping). Stir this back into the pot. Taste, and then add more (the same way) a bit at a time until it is to your liking. Also, some miso pastes are less-salty than others, so you may need to add a bit of salt here. Add the tofu, remove from the heat, and let it sit for just a minute or so.

Split the noodles between two (or three) bowls, and pour the miso broth and tofu over them. Add some watercress, green onions, cilantro, and red pepper flakes to each bowl and enjoy.

Serves 2 - 3.

Prep time: 5 minutes - Cook time: 5 minutes

If you make this recipe, I'd love to see it - tag it #101cookbooks on Instagram!

Apologies, comments are closed.

Comments

I also like South River Miso, especially the brown rice miso.

Darra

I love miso soup and if the soba noodles are made of pure buckwheat, they are naturally gluten-free so this is great for people with gluten issues. I like throwing in some sea veggies or mushrooms. As you said, this type of soup is more a launching pad for creative ideas rather than a stick-to-the-rules recipe. :-) Thanks for the inspiration! Melissa

Beautiful & delicious! I wanted to share one other "asian" health secret. That is if you have a "sick tummy" that keeps you running to the little girls room or just nauseated, cook yourself a batch of white rice, plain white rice. I always use calrose sushi rice becuase it is so sticky, add a bit too much water and cook just a little too long. This is what (ask any Japanese native) is ministered as medicine to children and adults alike. It s a miraclie worker! Who knew? I have recommended this to friends for years, most will try it and look at me as if I am a miracle worker. Nope, just repeated wisdom I was given. Be well!

Beautiful & delicious! I wanted to share one other "asian" health secret. That is if you have a "sick tummy" that keeps you running to the little girls room or just nauseated, cook yourself a batch of white rice, plain white rice. I always use calrose sushi rice becuase it is so sticky, add a bit too much water and cook just a little too long. This is what (ask any Japanese native) is ministered as medicine to children and adults alike. It s a miraclie worker! Who knew? I have recommended this to friends for years, most will try it and look at me as if I am a miracle worker. Nope, just repeated wisdom I was given. Be well!

We also love the South River Miso that was mentioned above. Our favorite is the barley variety mixed with tofu or seitan, carrots, any leafy green that we have on hand or snow peas and thinly sliced yellow onions...and of course, it's always better the second day!

Heidi, great idea to add the soba noodles. I have been making miso soup nearly everyday for lunch lately - it's just so good for you and I love soups this time of year. Here is my method http://green-lemonade.com/miso-mochi-yum

Red miso paste has recently been on our list. We used it for an orange miso eggplant dish and just recently in a jalapeno miso dressing over tofu. We always pair miso with sesame oil. They're like Peaches & Herb...reunited and it feels so good!

This is standard fare at our house, too, almost always with soba noodles, and usually with something green like mild mustard or collard greens, pac choi, and scissors-snipped dried wakame. If the kitchen is stocked and I've got the time, we add ginger, garlic, tofu and shiitakes and maybe a shake of sesame seeds. This is one of the ways I introduced greens to my toddler--I chiffonade them so that they are easy to pick up with the noodles.

Heidi E.

I like to microplane a bit of ginger and lemon zest into my miso soups!

Marie

Loved the two articles on dashi. You add so much to my love of food, and joy of sharing it with others! You inspire me to experiment and others are inspired in turn by what I cook. I was thinking the other day, I must tell Heidi that she's a very important and loved member of our household!

Janie in London

Another big vote for South River Miso, made in western MA. They are experts, and they take great care with their product. Give them a try, especially if you can't find hand-crafted, high quality miso in your local store.

I love to do a soft boiled egg cut in half along with the fried tofu pouches that would be used for kitsune udon. For the base, I use the powdered dashi you can buy in pouches and keep it in the freezer to stay fresh. Some of the other posters mentioned that some miso contains the dashi, but I think that makes my salad dressings and marinades to fishy. For some of the darker miso pastes - I make a marniade with 1 part miso, 1 part jam/jelly, and 1 part white wine.

Ariane

In addition to recommending shichimi togarashi, I also think you should check out yuba. It's a traditional Kyoto specialty that appeared in my miso soup there every morning. Yuba is the "skin" that forms over tofu. It's savoury and delicate like chicken skin. As an omnivore, I still found it one of the best parts of my breakfast. HS: Yes! Great call Madeline. Yuba is a lot of fun to use - for those of you who haven't seen it - look to Japanese markets. And in the Bay Area I get mine at either the SF or San Rafael farmers market at Hodo Soy. You can use like noodles, use as spring roll wrap, shredded, chopped, etc, etc.

Prediction: my husband will soon tire of miso soup. Thanks for starting another food phase in my house, Heidi! :) Oh and am I the first to say "miso hungry"? HS: First chuckle of the day ;)

anne

I like a poached egg in mine, sometimes with chopped cucumber and pickled ginger added right before I eat it. I keep meaning to try a little shredded cabbage in it, but I haven't yet.

Ruth

This looks delicious and SO simple. I'm going to try making it this week since its freezing cold in Seattle! :)

Wow. Keep the great comments coming. It's fun to hear how each of you approach miso soup differently. The one thing I wanted to add in response to Sasutan's comment (and as a reference for those of you who do eat fish)...My pal Harris wrote this article on dashi for the New York Times. You can also read more about a range of miso soups on his site Japanese Food Report.

This looks REALLY healthy & hearty, Heidi. I make several Korean versions of miso soup all the time, and use mostly kelp & dried anchovies for dashi stock. And as someone mentioned above, adding Korean fermented red pepper paste(called "Go-chu-jang") into miso blend kicks up your miso soup another notch!

Enjeong

Like Chris, I live in Portland, OR, and Uwajimaya sells a locally-made miso that's just fantastic. It's a bit chunky with bits of soy in it, but the flavor is crazy good. Sometimes for lunch, I roll balls of miso with wakame, dehydrated green onion, dehydrated tamago (egg), dashi base, and dehydrated tofu to add to hot water at work - it's fantastic and very filling.

What a nice take on miso soup. I bought hacho miso by mistake at the grocery store instead of the white one to make my first batch of miso soup and it's very strong. I would love to see what sort of additions you make to soups you make with the stronger flavored miso.

Comments are closed.

Apologies, comments are closed.

More Recipes

Popular Ingredients

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of its User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

101 Cookbooks is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. Any clickable link to amazon.com on the site is an affiliate link.